• Liberals’ reverse discrimination comes at a cost

    The government’s emphasis on equity and diversity is central to its branding. Its 50-50 cabinet has won universal praise. But now it has embarked on a campaign of reverse discrimination that deeply undermines the concepts of fairness and excellence… The new quotas for Canada Research Chairs are: 31 per cent women, 15 per cent visible minorities, 4 per cent disabled, 1 per cent aboriginal. And woe to you if you do not comply.

  • Feds say they can’t accept Senate changes to bill aiming to end Indian Act sexism

    … the government that came to power promising not just a better relationship with Canada’s Indigenous people but also a more gender-inclusive approach to governing will have to stick with some of the sexism in the act or face enormous new costs… eliminating all of the sex-based discrimination could increase the number of people who have Indian status by 80,000 to two million… Each is entitled to such things as tax breaks, supplementary health benefits and money for postsecondary education.

  • Childcare Expense Tax Breaks Need New Approach

    … the report proposes switching from the current tax deduction to a generous federal refundable tax credit model – along the lines of Quebec’s existing tax credit – that would considerably lower the effective price of childcare for low- to middle-income families, with the net gains from the credit slowly vanishing at higher income levels… for the federal government, which would be instituting the childcare fiscal subsidy, induced tax revenues would reduce the cost of financing the program. For provincial governments, new tax revenues generated by extra maternal work would be a windfall that could be used to fund other priorities.

  • Basic income would give women choices

    The women who would benefit most from basic income are the poorest and most marginalized among us, with and without children, often members of racialized groups. Some are unable to work in paid employment. Others work in part-time, precarious, poorly paid, often exploitive conditions… an adequate basic income will give the most marginalized women more choice: more choice about how to spend their valuable time, more choice about leaving exploitive labour conditions, more choice about leaving abusive relationships.

  • The Jane Addams Model

    She sought to change the world by planting herself deeply in a particular neighborhood. She treated each person as a unique soul… There are many philanthropists and caregivers today who dislike theory and just want to get practical. It is this sort of doer’s arrogance and intellectual laziness that explains why so many charities do no good or do positive harm.

  • Wynne government promises much-needed investment in child care

    This funding promises to help 24,000 kids access daycare, addressing an urgent funding shortfall. Right now some 15,400 kids are on the waitlist for subsidized care, while at the same time more than 4,000 spaces sit vacant because parents can’t afford fees that run as high as $20,000 a year… Funding subsidized spaces… will help some women back into the work force, improving the family’s bottom line while boosting the economy and the tax base.

  • Liberal budget’s child-care funding commendable, but won’t help families any time soon

    The first four years amount to about half a billion dollars each to be added to an annual system which, even in its current woeful state, costs provinces $4.2-billion… Child-care experts estimate that it would actually cost closer to $12-billion a year – from all governments – to run a system which, to quote Ottawa’s current buzzwords, would be “accessible, affordable and flexible.” … “The resources will have the most impact if we start with those who are most vulnerable.

  • The ‘inverted justice’ of Canada’s family courts and how they got this way

    … in the 1980s and ’90s, there was a perfect storm of change. Legal feminism was increasingly informed by radical feminism; divorce came to be seen as a source of women’s poverty; family law had blossomed as a proper branch of practice; the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms “opened the door to greater legal and judicial participation in the formation of social policy” … In that climate emerged a social policy aimed at reducing poverty by focusing on private responsibility.

  • Alcohol and assault: What all young women need to know

    … alcohol isn’t responsible for rape. Rapists are responsible for rape… But if you could do something to reduce the risk… wouldn’t you? There are many things we can do better to reduce sexual violence. We must teach more young men to have respect for women. We must also teach young men and young women alike to have respect for booze. That’s not blaming women – it’s empowering them to manage risk.

  • The new Liberal budget will send money for ‘children’ right to the wealthy and the bureaucrats

    Currently only about 15 per cent of Canadian children 0-5 are in daycare centres. Statistics Canada reports that higher-income families are more likely to use this arrangement. Taxpayers are funding higher-income families with huge subsidies for institutional child care at the expense of lower income families — including single parents — who prioritize parental child care… To efficiently fund child care we should fund children, not spaces and their massive related system costs. We could do this by increasing the federal government’s child benefit.