• Canada’s approach to board diversity needs a rethink

    Women made up 12 per cent of all board seats examined in the study, up 1 percentage point from 11 per cent in 2015… The dissatisfaction with the current regulatory regime highlights the need to consider mandatory quotas… the CSA found that only 9 per cent of companies have internal targets for women on their boards, with a mere 2 per cent having targets for women in executive positions.

  • Why trolls love to pick on women

    Are trolls just hardcore misogynists? Not quite. “They’re like schoolyard bullies. They seek out people they think are weaker than themselves. They’re looking for someone who’s more submissive and maybe they feel deserves to be degraded in some way. I think a lot of them have problems with women” … Troll behaviour is highly associated with what are known as the “dark” personality traits, which are also far more common in men.

  • Increase funding for a national child care program

    Experts say Ottawa is planning to spend $500 million a year for the next 10 years to build a child care network across the country. As much as that is, it’s far from the 1 per cent of GDP experts say is necessary to build a quality system… while three-quarters of mothers of young children are in the workforce, there are licensed spots available for less than a quarter of children under 5. And those that are available are incredibly expensive.

  • Study urges Liberals to overhaul parental leave benefits

    [The IRPP] says the federal government should consider taking parental benefits out of the employment insurance system and give it a new federal program to ensure that more parents can qualify for benefits… As is… there is a cohort of those new parents, particularly mothers, who don’t qualify for benefits, or can’t qualify because they are self-employed or freelancers – a problem likely to increase with the widening of the “gig” economy.

  • What do working German women have that Canadians don’t? Lots of help from above

    Women in Canada… are working about as much as they can under the limitations of the Canadian system… The amount of free or highly subsidized all-day child care remains extremely limited (except in Quebec). There are few incentives for companies to move women from part-time into full-time employment while maintaining family-friendly hours. The tax system remains more favourable toward one-income families. The pay gap between men and women remains astonishingly large…

  • To close the gender wage gap, men must vocally support more equality

    … wage equality not only benefits corporate growth, but also promotes global economic prosperity… We still haven’t shaken off the preconceived notion that gender equality is solely a woman’s issue fought by women for women, which in turn keeps breeding the problem. If men are not actively engaged in overcoming gender inequality, how can we ever achieve wage parity?

  • GENDER EQUALITY Who is minding the gap?

    Canada is higher than the OECD average in its gender pay gap, ranking as the seventh most unequal of 34 industrialized countries… Despite higher levels of education and more access to the work force, “ women’s efforts to build a better life are hampered by the unequal distribution of unpaid work, the gender barriers to many fields of work, the undervaluing of jobs held predominantly by women, and the often unspoken social norms that offer men higher wages and rates of promotion from the moment they enter the work force”… pay gaps are even greater for racialized and Indigenous women.

  • Abortion pill rollout deeply flawed

    … why should abortion still live in the realm of charity? It is legal. It is a basic human right. When women don’t have this right, some of them die… The drug, legalized 15 years ago in the U.S. and decades ago in countries like France and China, is included on the World Health Organization’s list of essential medicines. But in Canada, women in small towns will have to travel to make the request.

  • Unfounded sexual assault cases: A human-rights issue

    The OHRC has made enforcing human rights in the criminal-justice system one of its key priorities for the next three to five years. We are also committed to promoting a human-rights culture through education – to address and eliminate, at the source, the kinds of stereotypes that may be behind some of these statistics. This is about our humanity and the true meaning of equal justice for all. Sexual-assault survivors must be taken seriously.

  • How the Toronto police have kept unfounded rates low

    The problem with decisions being guided by instinct is that instinct can be influenced by subconscious beliefs that have been affected by long-held societal opinions about sexual assault. Instead, when it comes to sexual-assault investigations, officers must have tangible evidence or an admission from the victim before marking a case as unfounded.