• Limits on income sprinkling cut into family businesses

    In the past, business owners would sprinkle income to family members in lower tax brackets through dividends as a way to lower the family’s overall tax bill. For many business owners, this was considered a perk for a spouse’s involvement in the daily operations, even if they weren’t a paid employee, or to help pay for a child’s education. The federal government cracked down on income splitting as part of a broader set of tax changes for private corporations.

  • To avoid catastrophic climate change, we need carbon pricing

    The adoption of carbon pricing is accelerating, and there are more real-world examples that carbon pricing works with each passing year… The Nobel Prize and the IPCC report are just two more data points in a sea of evidence. Climate change is real, climate change is a problem and climate change deserves a serious policy response. There will be disagreements over how we move forward, but we need to tell the truth.

  • The dirty little secret anti-carbon tax folks would prefer you did not know

    You can try to cut emissions by other ways: regulations on business are a particular favourite. But those come with costs just as surely as a carbon tax does — every dollar of which would be passed on to the same “hard-working families” the critics pretend to care about. In fact, for virtually any alternative you can name (subsidies are even worse) the costs are higher — often much higher — per tonne of emissions reduced than for an equivalent carbon tax.

  • Provincial spending cuts will take people from bad to worse

    Ontario already has Canada’s lowest per-person program spending, including the lowest per-person investment in health care. There’s a reason school repairs are backlogged and hallway medicine has made a comeback. Now a 15 per cent cut threatens to take people from bad to worse. Already, Ford has cut $330 million a year from mental health and $100 million from school repairs… Working-class people are already struggling with low wages, no benefits and unaffordable everyday life.

  • Corporate Canada is Demanding More Tax Giveaways. They Already Get $18 Billion From Special Loopholes.

    The billions in tax revenue that could be generated simply by closing tax loopholes could instead be invested in new public programs and initiatives like National Pharmacare, green infrastructure or universal childcare… In other words, Corporate Canada is asking Canadians to choose between public programs that benefit everyone or more tax giveaways for big business and the wealthiest 1%.

  • Ontarians rally in support of $15 minimum wage: ‘We cannot survive’

    A study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives found that a minimum-wage increase to $15 an hour would mean an extra $1,465 in the pockets of the working poor, as compared to Ford’s plan to freeze the rate at $14 and eliminate provincial income taxes on those making less than $30,000. The report found that two-thirds of the 4.9 million Ontarians making less than $30,000 already pay no income tax.

  • Crazy rich Canadians: How to tax the 1%

    … federal and provincial governments have pursued the wrong strategy by pushing up rates above 50 per cent. Instead, a far better approach would have been to broaden tax bases that would have mitigated rather increased the scope for tax avoidance and, at the same time simplify, reduce distortions and improve fairness… it’s time to have a serious effort at reviewing the tax system to grow the economy and make taxes fair.

  • Should Canada have an inheritance tax?

    The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, in its report called “Born to Win,” says a Canadian inheritance tax “could go a long way to curbing the tendency of Canada’s tax system to heighten socially, politically and economically harmful levels of wealth concentration in Canada.” … the average net worth of Canada’s 87 wealthiest families rose by 37 per cent between 2012 and 2016 … while the net worth of middle class families increased by only 16 per cent… over the same period.

  • Stop hate at its root — economic injustice

    … if we really want to stop hate, we need to do more than just call it out. We need to recognize that it is growing economic inequality that creates the conditions for hate to fester… There is no excuse for inaction in the face of economic injustice. It’s time to implement real solutions. Solutions like universal pharmacare, which economists say is more than feasible and will save us billions of dollars… Solutions like universal child care… Solutions like an immediate federal investment in housing…

  • Ford picks up class war where Mike Harris left off

    Now, in Ontario, we’re back to a full-frontal embrace of inequality… What makes this revival particularly insidious is that Ford didn’t campaign on it; he refused to reveal where he’d wield the knife to produce $6 billion in spending cuts, and specifically denied he would end the Basic Income Pilot Project… Another clear signal… was its decision last month to cut in half the scheduled increase in benefits for social assistance recipients, including those with disabilities.