• Our Biggest Health Factor Is Largely Ignored

    … for most people, for most diseases, knowledge isn’t enough… There are much larger forces underlying the choices individuals make that have a much larger effect on how healthy we are as a people. Often described as the “social determinants of health,” these forces play out across populations, providing an answer to the question of why some people appear to make worse choices than others, and pointing towards why some people are healthier than others.

  • Delving into the health data shows that Canadian kids aren’t all right

    it is worth underscoring that the single biggest danger in a Canadian child’s life is the car… Unintentional injuries – almost all of them preventable – are the No. 1 killer of children and youth, with motor vehicles posing the greatest risk, followed by falls and drowning… Number two is suicide. In 2016, 35 children under the age of 14 took their own lives, as did another 203 aged 15-19… Poverty invariably means living in substandard housing and wrestling with food insecurity.

  • Celebrate Labour Day by telling Doug Ford: “Hands off our rights!”

    In its first months, the Ford government has used legislation to force workers off the picket lines, undermining their democratic right to collective bargaining. It has cut funding to schools and to after-school programs. In Doug Ford’s Ontario, our government exchanges the rights of Ontarians and quality public services for a lower minimum beer price… The premier has shamefully said that he will cancel the raise in the minimum wage… Without that increase, even a minimum wage worker who has full-time work will still fall below the poverty line.

  • Under Doug Ford, Ontario is turning the clock back for labour

    … Ontario is enjoying the lowest unemployment rate in almost two decades at 5.4 per cent. And in Ontario’s hospitality industry, one of the sectors most affected by the minimum wage increase, predicted job losses turned into employment gains with more than 7,000 new positions created since January… Ontario also would be wise to ignore knee-jerk fear-mongering from the small-business lobby to throw out the Liberals’ well-researched new workplace legislation.

  • Trump, Canada and life after NAFTA

    … we need to increase our high-value added exports to global markets through support for innovation, as appears to be on the federal government’s agenda. We should also think about restrictions on the export of unprocessed resources to raise the job content of our exports. And we need to look at our capacity to increase Canada’s share of our own large domestic market by displacing manufactured imports in those sectors where we retain productive capacity.

  • Canada must add more medical resident training positions

    With our institutions filled with foreign physicians who are paying to be there, albeit temporarily, Canada has not felt the urgency to address its doctor shortage. More must be done to add resident training positions for Canadians who study here or abroad. Our system relies not only on doctors from Saudi Arabia, but also Qatar, the UAE, Bahrain and Kuwait. If they were all to withdraw their physicians, how could we guarantee the safety of our patients?

  • Canada must seize the moment to get pharmacare right

    … the new provincial government has announced the cancellation of OHIP+, which provided prescription drug coverage for seniors and people under 25. This announcement turns back efforts to provide greater access to prescription drugs for Ontarians. Without a national pharmacare program, Ontarians will see greater costs and fewer benefits… Failure to take medication as prescribed can greatly reduce health outcomes and put lives at risk. It also adds strain and cost to a health-care system that is already overburdened.

  • Should Canada have an inheritance tax?

    The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, in its report called “Born to Win,” says a Canadian inheritance tax “could go a long way to curbing the tendency of Canada’s tax system to heighten socially, politically and economically harmful levels of wealth concentration in Canada.” … the average net worth of Canada’s 87 wealthiest families rose by 37 per cent between 2012 and 2016 … while the net worth of middle class families increased by only 16 per cent… over the same period.

  • Business group calls for ‘full repeal’ of Ontario’s new workplace protections

    The umbrella body representing 60,000 Ontario small business owners is calling on the provincial government to fully repeal the most sweeping changes to workplace protections in decades — including a higher minimum wage, equal pay protections for temporary workers, and paid emergency leave days… The legislation introduced under Liberal premier Kathleen Wynne last year was aimed at strengthening protections for vulnerable workers…

  • Stop hate at its root — economic injustice

    … if we really want to stop hate, we need to do more than just call it out. We need to recognize that it is growing economic inequality that creates the conditions for hate to fester… There is no excuse for inaction in the face of economic injustice. It’s time to implement real solutions. Solutions like universal pharmacare, which economists say is more than feasible and will save us billions of dollars… Solutions like universal child care… Solutions like an immediate federal investment in housing…