• Information watchdog blasts Liberals ahead of her retirement

    “Bill C-58 is a bill for the bureaucracy, it’s definitely not a bill for transparency,” she said of the proposed legislation now in front of the Senate. “The government has made some amendments to the proposed legislation, but it is still regressive in many respects.” Ms. Legault laments the fact the legislation would allow the government to refuse to respond to requests that are too vaguely defined, stating that goes against the principle at the heart of access to information.

  • Human rights case hopes to give disabled people the freedom to live in small group homes

    A groundbreaking human rights case set to begin on Monday could help hundreds of Nova Scotians with disabilities move out of institutions and into small group homes, says a lawyer who has led a three-year-long effort to bring the cases before a formal hearing.

  • After the Sears debacle, why is Ontario making it easier to underfund pensions?

    Leaving retirees to scramble in their golden years is cruel, and it is unconscionable to expect an overtaxed middle class to foot the bill for corporate chicanery. If governments won’t stop companies from dodging their pension obligations, it’s just a matter of time before we see the next Sears Canada. And that’s a prospect that should worry us all.

  • We need to focus more on mental-health care

    … access to appropriate, effective mental-health care needs to be seen as a basic human right and component of a publicly funded health-care system. / People suffering mental illness were deinstitutionalized without necessary community supports, to be managed by law enforcement and ER staff who lack the skills and facilities to respond respectfully. / The article understates real-world factors (marginalization, social determinants, and access to competent help) that can thwart the potential impacts of even the most cutting-edge research.

  • With Philpott at the helm, Ottawa (finally) takes action on Indigenous issues

    One of Dr. Philpott’s most welcome actions is to finally get Ottawa to comply with a Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruling related to Jordan’s Principle… Health Canada has approved more than 29,000 requests in recent months, most for children with disabilities and mental-health issues… the boldest shift of all has been in funding… First Nations with good financial records will now get guaranteed 10-year funding, fully indexed, and with little paperwork. Rather than be wards of the state, we will see the emergence of more autonomous First Nations.

  • A memo to Canada: Indigenous people are not your incompetent children

    Although Indian Affairs has had to report to numerous people and departments throughout its history, it certainly has never had to report to Indigenous people. That lack of accountability and responsibility has continued for more than 150 years, unchecked… Canada agreed to include Section 35 in the Constitution, legally enshrining recognition and affirmation of Indigenous rights. Although… There have been no moves to change the Indian Act in a way that reflects the Indigenous right to both self-government and self-determination

  • Why the Soulpepper Four skipped the cops and went after Albert Schultz in civil court

    While many a criminal case has floundered trying to overcome the standard of proof beyond a reasonable doubt, civil plaintiffs need only prove their case on a balance of probabilities – more-likely-than-not. Civil cases almost never go to trial, dramatically increasing the prospects that these women will see some sort of negotiated settlement rather than the winner-take-it-all conclusion that is more common in criminal cases.

  • Women won’t be silenced in 2018

    … sexual assaults and harassment of women would not be so common in the workplace if more women occupied positions of power… the dial on women’s participation on boards of directors, never mind in executive positions, has barely budged. It’s at 21 per cent in Canada, and 20 per cent in the U.S. The same holds true in politics… The percentage of women in the U.S. Congress sits at 20 per cent. It’s 24 per cent in the House of Commons.

  • Why this unbeliever is happy to celebrate Christmas

    The truth is that our society has been given its moral principles by Christianity, and those principles shape us, whether we are committed to a religion or not. Christian feelings enter in the moral air we breathe and find a comfortable home within us. We believe we should see the welfare of others as at least as important as our own. We should treat everyone fairly… If we go out of our way to smooth the path of minorities, we are reflecting the same feelings.

  • Fighting a war of attrition on college campuses to the last student body

    A sheepish Liberal government — the provincial paymaster behind the scenes — has acknowledged that it now needs to do for colleges what it long ago did for school boards. The government relies on an independent advisory body to declare whenever a strike threatens the school year, and now wants to emulate that model at the college level.