• Ontario’s child support law faces constitutional challenge

    … under the federal Divorce Act, disabled adult children are eligible for child support whether or not they are still in school. But Ontario’s Family Law Act, which covers child support for unmarried parents, makes no provision for adult disabled children. “If children of divorced parents can claim support for both education and disability beyond age 18, then children born to parents who were never married should enjoy the same rights”

  • Safeguard Disability Rights – Sign The Un Protocol

    With great fanfare in 2010, the Harper government ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). However, it never took the next step of ratifying its Optional Protocol, which is essential for holding Canada accountable for its commitment… Over 26,000 Canadians are looking forward to having Prime Minister Trudeau safeguard disability rights by signing and ratifying the Protocol by the end of 2017.

  • Canada Without Poverty, the UN and Human Rights

    In March-April 2017, Canada will be reviewed for its compliance with the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Canada ratified the Convention in 2010 which makes this the first review cycle that applies to Canada… The first step is to provide a written submission to the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. For NGOs, the written submission details ongoing issues and concerns about the state’s human rights record.

  • Who pays when native children fall between the cracks?

    Yes, indigenous children must receive medical and social services equal to other Canadians. A tribunal can define those rights, but the precise details of where the money comes from, and where it goes, must largely be left to negotiations among Ottawa, the provinces and First Nations.

  • Ottawa hasn’t earned trust on indigenous child welfare

    The government should do as it promised and, as the tribunal’s legally binding order demands, immediately close the funding gap… Ottawa’s slow response has been a persistent source of shame, particularly for a government that so often touts its lofty promises on indigenous issues… energy would be better spent protecting the health and safety of indigenous children than pushing back at the tribunal.

  • Should police be required to collect race-based data to fight discrimination?

    In the U.S., race data has proven instrumental in revealing problems of discriminatory policing. Some also point to the Star’s racial profiling investigations as providing the proof of concept that while race-based statistics can be misused to stigmatize vulnerable groups, they can also be a powerful tool to expose and destroy systemic racism.

  • Preliminary inquiries: Let judges make the call

    The intelligent compromise is this: since they have limited residual utility, there should be no preliminary inquiries unless whoever wants one first convinces a judge it is necessary in the interests of justice, following which it cannot be taken away. Judges know best when their courtroom is used well or poorly. Given the chance, judges will manage courtroom time effectively.

  • Tribunal can’t enforce Indigenous child-welfare ruling, Ottawa says

    The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal does not have the power to ensure its rulings are followed or to dictate how public money is spent, the federal government has argued in response to accusations it has not met a tribunal demand to end the discriminatory underfunding of Indigenous child welfare… “the tribunal does not have the statutory authority to enforce its own orders.”

  • The public interest in binding arbitration for doctors

    … it has been argued… that government should not agree to arbitration for physicians, because this would result in unwarranted and unreasonable compensation increases for physicians… contrary to this bald assertion, the experience in provinces where binding interest arbitration for physician compensation is in place… is that, where physicians are treated fairly and respectfully, they have proven themselves to be more than willing and responsible partners in working with government to improve the health care system.

  • A leader to improve our legal system

    In addition to expanding the role of paralegals, the government could transfer many basic legal issues such as employment and motor vehicle claims from the courts to speedier and more efficient administrative tribunals. It could review legislation to reduce reliance on lawyers altogether through proven innovations such as expanding no-fault compensation for accident victims and installing default safeguards in real estate and testamentary transactions.