• Resistance to Innovation in the Social Sector, from 1992 to 2017

    … the sector is not so much facing crisis as it is emerging from hiding. Taking risks, innovating, and affecting systems change, are as elusive as ever… It is thus understandably difficult and rare to sustain a long-term campaign of change amidst shifting sands, political priorities, and turnover… The commitment to scaling and sustaining innovative programs requires boldness, vision, and a willingness to take risks based on short pilots.

  • Province must bridge gap between affluent and needy schools

    One of the biggest barriers to equity, the group found, is fundraising. As the study points out, schools from richer neighbourhoods have a huge advantage with some able to raise up to $200,000 a year while others in poorer neighbourhoods couldn’t raise anything… Forty-eight per cent of elementary schools reported fundraising for learning resources such as computers, art supplies or other products or upgrades that clearly tilt the educational playing field.

  • Canada’s charitable sector is more diverse than (some) rating agencies think

    While rigorous accreditation processes… and charity rating agencies… are not exactly the same, the sentiment is similar – people looking for some form of assessment about the impact of organizations. The challenge is that some of the criteria and metrics used by charity rating agencies in Canada are not effective, and are in fact misleading.

  • A welcome end to charity audits

    The announcement came last week in response to a panel report that recommended the audits, initiated by the Harper government, be suspended immediately. That will give the government time to make recommended administrative and legislative changes aimed at giving charities more freedom to speak out on public policy.

  • Take the politics out of charity? Far better to just cancel the tax break

    If I give to my preferred charity with my own money, that is entirely my affair. But if I claim a tax credit on it, I am effectively forcing you and everyone else to pay for it as well… There is nothing voluntary in my conscription of your assistance. Neither is there much of the charitable spirit in demanding to be recompensed for what ought to be given freely.

  • The Jane Addams Model

    She sought to change the world by planting herself deeply in a particular neighborhood. She treated each person as a unique soul… There are many philanthropists and caregivers today who dislike theory and just want to get practical. It is this sort of doer’s arrogance and intellectual laziness that explains why so many charities do no good or do positive harm.

  • The Case Against Policy Advocacy Deregulation

    There are certainly cases in which charities have played a productive role in changing public policy for the better — successful campaigns to combat smoking and drunk driving come readily to mind. And though these contributions have produced clearly beneficial results, it does not necessarily follow that the general regulatory framework should be relaxed or amended to allow charities to engage more actively in public policymaking.

  • Canadian foundation donates $12-million to support Indigenous people

    The Slaight Family Foundation has committed to providing that money over the next five years to 15 non-profit organizations that are engaged with the First Nations, Inuit and Métis on a wide range of initiatives, from health and education to cultural activities and preventing violence against Indigenous women.

  • Canadians are generous, but government spending on charities is not

    The key problem for charities is not a decline in the generosity of individual Canadians, which has been quite steady in the context of a soft economy, but the general retrenchment of government social spending… the Trudeau government has promised to develop a “social innovation” strategy and to increase investment in “social infrastructure.” … a strong charitable and not-for-profit sector also requires strong public financial support.

  • What are we talking about when we talk about social innovation?

    … social innovation: undertakings that don’t neatly fit into conventional boxes, but deliver multiple social or environment benefits and even profits, all while holding out the potential for the sort of scalability that promises broader transformation… what are we talking about when we talk about social innovation? – could re-shape the relationship between governments, private investors, and civil society for a generation to come.