• Many Working Families Face Tax Trap

    Working parents with children—particularly low-income families— face prohibitive tax rates that discourage taking on extra employment to get ahead, according to a new report from the C.D. Howe Institute. In “Two-Parent Families with Children: How Effective Tax Rates Affect Work Decisions” author Alexandre Laurin finds that mothers and poorer families are the most adversely affected by this tax trap.

  • Liberal reform of StatsCan checks all the right boxes

    The former Conservative government’s argument that the census is an outrageous invasion of privacy, an argument it used to briefly kill the long-form version, was a fatuous one. The Liberal government was right to bring back the mandatory long-form census in 2015. The Liberal’s latest reform also establishes the Canadian Statistics Advisory Council, which will issue an annual report on the state of the national statistics system, and spells out the role of the Chief Statistician of Canada in greater detail.

  • A memo to Canada: Indigenous people are not your incompetent children

    Although Indian Affairs has had to report to numerous people and departments throughout its history, it certainly has never had to report to Indigenous people. That lack of accountability and responsibility has continued for more than 150 years, unchecked… Canada agreed to include Section 35 in the Constitution, legally enshrining recognition and affirmation of Indigenous rights. Although… There have been no moves to change the Indian Act in a way that reflects the Indigenous right to both self-government and self-determination

  • Social media is no more a nemesis to democracy than books

    … this method of communication makes it easier to create anti-democratic movements… editors of the Economist magazine drew up an even more severe charge sheet. Social media, they said, spreads untruth and outrage, creating a “politics of contempt” in the process… A historic pattern lies behind these troubled accusations. When a new form of communication is invented and becomes popular, it creates uneasiness… It may be used by people with dangerous ideas.

  • Pick a fight with me Mr. Joyce, not those working the Tim Hortons pickup window

    Big businesses and major corporations continue to celebrate record profits, while many people in this province juggle multiple jobs and still can’t afford the basics. CEOs enjoy massive salary increases while their workers can’t pay their bills. That’s not right, and it’s not who we are as a society. It’s past time we put people ahead of profits.

  • Canada’s unemployment rate plunges to lowest in 40 years

    The jobless rate fell to 5.7 per cent in December, Statistics Canada said Friday in Ottawa, the lowest in the current data series that begins in 1976. The number of jobs rose by 78,600, bringing the full-year employment gain to 422,500. That’s the best annual increase since 2002. The gain of 78,600 positions far exceeded the expectations of analysts… The nation added 394,200 full-time jobs last year, the biggest gain since 1999

  • Minimum wages can make for maximum consternation

    Minimum-wage policies affect about 15 per cent of the workforce, and while forgoing 60,000 jobs by the end of 2019 is not a desirable outcome for our economy, and for younger workers who stand to be hardest hit, it’s not catastrophic in a labour market that created close to 500,000 new jobs last year… None of the preceding is to say that hurriedly jacking Ontario’s minimum wage from $11.60 to $15 in less than two years… was a good idea.

  • Disruption we can get behind

    The main innovation of most self-declared disruptors is that they’ve found a way to take an even bigger share of the wealth from the workers who produce it than was possible before we all carried around the internet in our pockets. It’s not the disruptors who are the biggest problem, it’s the inequality—in incomes, in power and in access to scarce resources—which is worsening in Canada, to the benefit of a small number of established and disruptive elites alike.

  • Why can’t Canada keep up on child care?

    According to OECD recommendations, Ottawa should be spending 1 per cent of Canada’s GDP on child care. Our government currently invests only 0.25 per cent. By quadrupling our federal investment, we would both make child care more affordable and improve the quality of programs through supporting the education and training of early childhood educators. It would improve pay and benefits to the child care workforce – those compassionate people who care lovingly, creatively and professionally for children and who are so instrumental in their development.

  • For foster kids to succeed, they need more than just care

    … when the system parents 17,000 individuals in Ontario (and about 70,000 nationwide), and channels them on the same bleak life trajectory, the issue is systemic… Our system has stagnated in the “activity trap” by focusing on activities and outputs rather than outcomes or impact measurement on youth who have gone through the protection system. In Ontario, and most Canadian jurisdictions, youth outcomes after care have never been tracked.