• No, postmodernism at universities isn’t a vile, cancerous doctrine

    Right-wing postmodernism flourishes by bulldozing dissent. The current occupant of the White House, and those leading rhetorical crusades in his shadow, are just late-model versions of real intellectual rot… Universities are always easy targets… We insist that when people utter falsehoods and nonsense, or behave intolerably, they will be challenged, on the facts, with reasons and arguments. It’s indoctrination, sure – into critical thinking.

  • Find permanent housing for the homeless

    … the answer to homelessness isn’t emergency shelters. It’s ensuring there is affordable accommodation so people don’t find themselves on the doorsteps of emergency shelters or, worse, on the street. To do that the city needs the help of Premier Kathleen Wynne and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Both could immediately begin to ease the city’s chronic housing shortage by funding two programs that are already in the works.

  • Here’s the gender gap that matters

    “Men have increasingly become the second sex in higher education,” … What’s clear from these trends is that educational inequality has worked its way up from elementary school, and is now solidly entrenched at all levels of attainment. This, in an age when higher education and cognitive skills are more important than ever… Higher education has become so feminized that it’s hard to see how it can be re-engineered to appeal to men.

  • All branches of government must rally together for Canadians with disabilities

    By creating standardized metrics that allow us to measure accessibility and have those anchored by global standards, we can measure progress and plan for improvements that will give us a consistent lens grounded in the principles of universal design so that a uniform manner of determining accessibility can be applied… By becoming inclusive and accessible in our built environment we create opportunity, liberate potential, maximize our labour pool and drive vibrant economic growth.

  • Words are powerful but LGBTQ2 equality requires more than a Trudeau apology

    … additional reforms are needed to tackle the problems of income inequality, sexual harassment at work, reproductive rights, the lack of affordable housing, bullying in schools, equal access to health care, and the intersection of multiple systems of oppression along racial and cultural lines which continue to bear down on LGBTQ2 people in unique and often subtle ways.

  • Ottawa starts healing process with LGBTQ apology

    Over our history, laws and policies enacted by the government led to the legitimization of much more than inequality – they legitimized hatred and violence, and brought shame to those targeted,” the Prime Minister said. “The state orchestrated a culture of stigma and fear around LGBTQ2 communities. And in doing so, destroyed people’s lives.

  • The talk Canada needs: Are we importing inequality?

    How did middle-class Peel suddenly become poor? … At the centre of Peel is Brampton, which is growing at three times the rate of Canada. Brampton, now the ninth-largest city in Canada, is a magnet for new immigrants… Many people will argue that low income among immigrants is due to discrimination against newcomers and fraying social safety nets. But it is also due to insufficient language skills, poorer credentials (even if they seem good on paper), and the lack of social networks and local knowledge of a culture that take years to establish.

  • Trudeau’s LGBTQ apology: A Globe guide to how we got here

    The apology process showed more signs of progress by the spring and summer of 2017, by which point Britain had issued its own apology and Germany promised compensation for gays and lesbians who had been discriminated against. Earlier this month, the Trudeau government officially set a date, Nov. 28, and then a sum of money: $145-million, the largest amount pledged by any national government to compensate sexual minorities.

  • Ontario Breaking Ground in Indigenous Postsecondary Education

    Ontario is taking a historic step in recognizing the unique role Indigenous Institutes have in the province’s postsecondary education system with the introduction of new legislation that, if passed, would transfer key functions and oversight to Indigenous people. The legislation, if passed, would recognize Indigenous Institutes as unique and complementary pillar of Ontario’s postsecondary education system… It is also another important step on the path to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

  • Federal Government Back with Big Dollars for Housing ‘This is very significant.’

    Canada signed and ratified the 1976 United Nations’ International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), which recognizes “the right of everyone to an adequate standard of living for himself and his family, including adequate food, clothing and housing, and to the continuous improvement of living conditions.” However, the right to housing has not been replicated in Canadian law and cannot be enforced. The strategy said the federal government will “introduce a bill to enable new legislation that promotes a human rights-based approach to housing.”