• No compromise in free speech debate

    Compromised free speech is simply the negation of the right itself, and so an impossible concession… social justice advocates, are not interested in free speech as it is conventionally understood. Rather, they are engaged in a revolution to tear-down established hierarchies… Many universities no longer view the pursuit of truth as their primary goal; instead, the social justice goal of protecting victim groups has become the priority.

  • The talk Canada needs: Are we importing inequality?

    How did middle-class Peel suddenly become poor? … At the centre of Peel is Brampton, which is growing at three times the rate of Canada. Brampton, now the ninth-largest city in Canada, is a magnet for new immigrants… Many people will argue that low income among immigrants is due to discrimination against newcomers and fraying social safety nets. But it is also due to insufficient language skills, poorer credentials (even if they seem good on paper), and the lack of social networks and local knowledge of a culture that take years to establish.

  • The problem with trying to protect pronouns

    What is slightly lost in this affair is the question of whether or not someone can in fact be sanctioned by the state for refusing to use someone’s preferred pronoun… The OHRC says, unhelpfully, that “the law is unsettled” about whether or not a person can insist on their own particular pronoun, or must settle for a generic compromise, such as “they.” … The OHRC also acknowledges that universities and the media have great leeway when addressing the issue as part of a public debate

  • What the Wilfrid Laurier professors got wrong about Bill C-16 and gender identity discrimination

    C-16 added gender identity and expression as grounds for discrimination under the Canadian Human Rights Act, but this applies to people employed by or receiving services from federally-regulated industries, such as banks or the public service… Universities instead fall under provincial codes — but the Ontario Human Rights Code has included gender identity and expression for five years now, long before Peterson gained fame for his arguments.

  • Ontario must make bail reform meaningful

    If you own a house, have a job, and have family or friends who can pledge a sizable sum of money and act as supervisors, you are likely to soon be on your way home… immigrants, the mentally ill, racialized groups, and the poor stand the least chance of being released on bail. Despite remaining wholly innocent under the law, they lose their freedom for months or years as the criminal process plays out.

  • Equal outcomes have replaced equality of opportunity

    No one would argue that discrimination has magically ceased to exist, or that we have reached a perfectly fair and just society. We never will. But the argument that equal outcomes are the one true measure of equality is corrosive. It means we’re doomed to see people through the prism of race and gender instead of talent and achievement. It means that people who refuse to reverse discriminate will be perceived as racist… Maybe you think it’s fine to rectify past injustices with fresh ones. Maybe you think diversity matters more than excellence. In that case, you’re going to make a very fine university administrator.

  • A wise approach on immigration

    It starts by increasing Canada’s immigration target just a bit next year to 310,000, then to 330,000 in 2019 and 340,000 in 2020… The government needs to follow through with concrete measures to attract well-educated, well-motivated people to Canada. It has already taken positive steps in this direction by streamlining visa applications and work permits for high-demand international employees. Immigration has always been key to Canada’s success.

  • Universities should not smother uncomfortable debates

    Universities, at their best, have always provided space for those who would challenge conventional wisdom. In this way, the academy has played a vital role in our social and cultural evolution… In these polarized times, this age-old struggle has become increasingly combative and dangerously divisive, with some on campus railing against political correctness to justify their hate and others imposing purity tests that chill rather than enable debate.

  • Canada’s universities commit to diversity with plan to make demographic data public

    The promise to address under-representation of some groups in areas where it may occur, whether it’s the lack of Indigenous students in professional faculties or women in leadership posts, comes as universities are discussing how to meet equity targets in the Canada Research Chairs (CRC) program… schools have consistently failed to meet equity targets set by the program’s steering committee. Academics with disabilities are particularly poorly represented among CRC holders

  • Let’s not dismiss the painful pattern of microaggressions

    … Examples of microaggressions included: general condescension; intuiting that others expected their work to be inferior; or being treated as an intimidating presence… Some people who aren’t subject to microaggressions view them as small, unimportant experiences that are blown out of proportion. But BEP participants told us their effects are real and cumulative… anti-black racism is an especially stubborn force.