• … Top 23 takeaways from the Ontario budget

    Ontario will become the first province to offer pharmacare to all young people, regardless of income, who are 24 and under. Some 4,400 prescription drugs will be covered… the abortion pill will provide an alternative to women seeing to end a pregnancy up to seven weeks… The province will spend $20 million to increase respite care for dementia patients and increase the number of seniors’ centres… From elementary schools to jails to seniors centres, the province is improving mental health services in many of its service areas…

  • Ottawa’s ‘name-blind’ hiring a modest experiment with real promise

    … the “name-blind” hiring project announced this week is simple; the names, emails and countries of birth of job-seekers will be removed from their applications, with the aim of preventing the bias – unconscious or otherwise – that too often leads employers not to bring in applicants of diverse backgrounds for interviews.

  • How postmodernism is infiltrating public life and policy

    People who produce facts – scientists, reporters, witnesses – do so from a particular social position… They rely on non-neutral methods… to communicate facts to people who receive, interpret and deploy them from their own social positions … Truth is not found, but made, and making truth means exercising power.” … The right has cottoned on to [these ideas] because they are useful, from a Machiavellian perspective.

  • Police oversight isn’t broken, it was built this way

    Thanks to Justice Michael Tulloch, who led the review and published his report last week, we have new clarity on the strategic dysfunction that is the SIU. Tulloch has made 129 recommendations for better police oversight, including dozens for the SIU. Many of Tulloch’s recommendations are painfully obvious… The tradition of having former police investigate current ones helps to explain why more than 97 per cent of all SIU investigations end without an officer being criminally charged.

  • Anti-Muslim hatred has no place in my Canada

    Like it or not, religious accommodation is the law, and the schools are devoted to inclusiveness. Our interest is to integrate new Canadians, not segregate them. We want their children to be educated in the public schools, not religious schools. So we’d better make sure the kids (and parents) feel comfortable there… We won’t always agree, especially over symbols that touch our deepest values. Let’s just hope we can keep finding ways to disagree politely.

  • Should police be required to collect race-based data to fight discrimination?

    In the U.S., race data has proven instrumental in revealing problems of discriminatory policing. Some also point to the Star’s racial profiling investigations as providing the proof of concept that while race-based statistics can be misused to stigmatize vulnerable groups, they can also be a powerful tool to expose and destroy systemic racism.

  • Ontario government unveils 3-year plan to battle racism

    Queen’s Park will introduce a framework for collecting race-based data across various institutions, including in the justice, education, health and child welfare sectors — a move that anti-racism activists have long called for. The directorate will also introduce an action plan for black youth and new legislation to “ensure future sustainability and accountability of the government’s anti-racism work.”

  • Black health needs to become a priority

    Black communities are disproportionately affected by health-related issues such as mental health, HIV/AIDS, heart disease, sickle cell, stroke and hypertension. But they have yet to be adequately addressed effectively within the Canadian health-care system… policy-makers need to recognize that racism and violence along with the social determinants of health play a role in the health outcomes of black communities in Canada.

  • Open the doors

    Economic-class immigrants, who gain entry into Canada primarily in recognition of their marketable skills, education, work experience and official-language fluency; family-reunification immigrants… and refugees. Statscan data show that skilled workers in the economic class earn very close to the national median after two years in the country, but family-class newcomers earn, on average, more than 40 per cent less… Government-sponsored refugees earn more than 60 per cent below the national median.

  • Learning black history makes Canadians better

    With black Canadians at just three per cent of the population, we’ve heard the argument that Black History Month is less relevant than commemorating the larger Indigenous or South Asian community’s respective histories. But Black History Month doesn’t come at the expense of others. In fact, learning about the black Canadian experience builds empathy; it doesn’t divide it.