• A man who’ll stand up for the rights of other men (and boys) on campus and in society

    … 13 years ago, it really was an orphan topic. Nobody could get their heads around the truth, upheld by a mountain of credible data, that almost as many men suffer from intimate partner violence as women do, violence right up to the most extreme level, and including knifings, burnings and pushing down stairs… Hard-line feminists continue to see men who believe they can also be victims and who want to talk about their victimhood as a threat to women’s interests.

  • You are on the front lines of mental illness — let’s talk

    Navigating health-care systems and finding great resources is a huge help. But even more basic is the ability to say three simple words whenever our loved ones begin to open up… 1. Tell 2. Me 3. More… allowing the vulnerable soul in front of you to slowly and safely process their thoughts is no lightweight task… being there is worth a lot… make an offer to help and see what comes back.

  • A portable housing benefit could ease our homeless crisis

    Here are five reasons why the portable housing benefit is a smart idea: 1. It is the most efficient way to help households in need and address homelessness… 2. It will reduce homelessness… 3. It will reduce poverty… 4. Its portability means it is tied to an individual, rather than a housing unit, giving people choice [and] … 5. It is already working.

  • Who pays when native children fall between the cracks?

    Yes, indigenous children must receive medical and social services equal to other Canadians. A tribunal can define those rights, but the precise details of where the money comes from, and where it goes, must largely be left to negotiations among Ottawa, the provinces and First Nations.

  • Ottawa hasn’t earned trust on indigenous child welfare

    The government should do as it promised and, as the tribunal’s legally binding order demands, immediately close the funding gap… Ottawa’s slow response has been a persistent source of shame, particularly for a government that so often touts its lofty promises on indigenous issues… energy would be better spent protecting the health and safety of indigenous children than pushing back at the tribunal.

  • Why trolls love to pick on women

    Are trolls just hardcore misogynists? Not quite. “They’re like schoolyard bullies. They seek out people they think are weaker than themselves. They’re looking for someone who’s more submissive and maybe they feel deserves to be degraded in some way. I think a lot of them have problems with women” … Troll behaviour is highly associated with what are known as the “dark” personality traits, which are also far more common in men.

  • The public interest in binding arbitration for doctors

    … it has been argued… that government should not agree to arbitration for physicians, because this would result in unwarranted and unreasonable compensation increases for physicians… contrary to this bald assertion, the experience in provinces where binding interest arbitration for physician compensation is in place… is that, where physicians are treated fairly and respectfully, they have proven themselves to be more than willing and responsible partners in working with government to improve the health care system.

  • Stop assaults against nurses and other health-care workers

    … underfunding and understaffing are “significant contributors” to workplace violence… unions recommend that the ministry of labour audit all of Ontario’s health-care facilities to make sure effective protections are in place; ensure that workplaces have safeguards such as personal monitors, alarms and identification of violent patients; and ensure adequate staffing levels and the presence of trained security personnel where needed.

  • Provinces get their cash, but do we get better health care?

    In the end, both Ottawa and the provinces/territories will be getting almost exactly what they asked for at the negotiating table… nobody really compromises and everyone saves face. What matters in the end is not whether we have one health accord or 13 health accords. What matters is: Will the transfer of these monies result in better health care?

  • If you like Canada’s liquor, transit and electricity monopolies, you’ll love the medicine cartel

    The [CMAJ] study… claims billions of health dollars could be saved if Canada were to adopt universal public coverage of prescription medications, aka, pharmacare… Nobody would argue that Canada’s pharmaceutical system is cheap or the most efficient. Thanks to a balkanized regime under the control of provincial jurisdictions with a heavy federal oversight, the dominant structure is one of central planning, not market forces.