• Let’s hope Canadian courts see the true meaning of the niqab

    The higher value of “social cohesion” has twice guided rulings against challenges to niqab bans by the European Court of Human Rights, which noted that the religious duty for women to cover was “hard to reconcile” with the principle of gender equality. Let us hope that our judiciary agrees and rules accordingly.

  • Province to include adult children with disabilities in child support law

    Ontario has introduced an amendment to the Family Law Act that would make all adult children with disabilities — including those whose parents were never married — eligible for child support… “The proposed change would update Ontario’s Family Law Act to more closely align Ontario’s child support legislation with the Federal Divorce Act as well as with the child support laws in the majority of other Canadian provinces and territories,”

  • Canadian tax hypocrisy that favours the rich must end: Broadbent

    Tax avoidance and evasion by the rich ultimately undermines democracy: it starves social programs and public services, increases after tax income and wealth inequality, and further concentrates economic resources in the hands of a few… Ordinary Canadians have a right to be angry that the very rich are being pampered by our political elites. The response should be broad-based, progressive tax reform to make the system much fairer and more transparent.

  • New family care policies provide more flexibility, but for whom?

    … because they continue to be based on the Employment Insurance (EI) system, the benefits may actually not be affordable to many… these levels of payments may actually not be a living wage and therefore may only benefit people at the higher income levels. In best practice Nordic countries, people get around 80 per cent of wages while on leave… most Canadians will not truly benefit from the greater flexibility provided.

  • Ottawa should do better on improving parental leave

    It’s difficult enough to sustain a household for 12 months under the current rules; doing without a full income for even longer will be a struggle for many… Second, it’s still extraordinarily difficult for parents who are working part-time or in other precarious work to access the EI parental leave program… third… Ottawa amended the Canada Labour Code for federally regulated workplaces… But that covers only 8 per cent of workers.

  • It’s time for Canada to measure up on kids with disabilities

    “What gets measured gets done.” Better information on the nature and needs of children and youth with disability is essential for policymakers to predict and plan for improved provision of efficient, equitable and inclusive services and supports. Better data will also allow for a deeper understanding of the education and employment requirements, how these influence important outcomes such as income, as well as challenges in accessing services for those with disability.

  • Bloated bureaucracy the real enemy of Indigenous reconciliation

    Two of the most vital measures of Indigenous reconciliation, the gap in child welfare funding and the national inquiry into murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls, have returned to centre stage this week… This government may have its heart in the right place when it comes to Indigenous reconciliation. But muscling aside an entrenched bureaucracy that slows, rather than speeds, action, will take more than that.

  • Supreme court ruling clears way for B.C. ski resort on sacred Indigenous land

    The Supreme Court ruled the approval of the ski resort did not violate section 2(a) of the Charter, which guarantees the right to freedom of religion. “The Ktunaxa’s claim does not fall within the scope of s. 2(a) because neither the Ktunaxa’s freedom to hold their beliefs nor their freedom to manifest those beliefs is infringed by the Minister’s decision to approve the project,” said the decision, written by Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin and Justice Malcolm Rowe.

  • Welfare in Canada, 2016

    Welfare incomes for the four illustrative households typically range between 20 and 40 percent of after-tax average incomes… When compared to after-tax median incomes, the adequacy picture comes out slightly better… Regardless of which measure is used, the figures tell a powerful story about the adequacy of welfare incomes of Canadians.

  • Bernie Sanders lauds Canadian health-care system in Toronto speech

    “if you want to expand and protect health care or education, there are people out there in every country in the world who think it is more important to give tax breaks to the richest people … what we need to do is take those oligarchs on.” … What went mostly unsaid during Mr. Sanders’s speech is that while Canada’s health-care system can look great compared with that of the United States, it can still fare poorly next to comparable countries.