• Immigrants make Canada the envy of the world

    Canada “is a country that does not ask about your origins; it only concerns itself with your destiny.” Those words were spoken by Peter Munk, founder and chairman of the Barrick Gold Corporation…
    The philanthropist who ensured that the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre offered the very best health care that Canadian patients and their families could hope for… was also an immigrant… Peter Munk’s story is one we hear time and again – immigrants who devote their lives to making Canada even better.

  • Canada’s multiculturalism is our identity

    On Oct. 8, 1971, … In addition to becoming an officially bilingual land, Canada would formally respect the diversity of its citizens’ languages, religions and cultures. The goal was integration; it was also about appeasing opposition to bilingualism. Mr. Trudeau faced no opposition in the House… quietly over the next decades, official multiculturalism lost its hokey qualities, as well as its capital letter, and evolved into an ingrained collective value.

  • Canada in 2018 is a country of global citizens

    Who would have guessed that 150 years after Confederation, Canada would become one of the most peaceably diverse societies on earth? Like other countries, we have many challenges to address and far to go to live up to the values we claim – but Canada has come a long way: from a colony of deferential subjects to a country of global citizens.

  • The intolerance industry is working overtime in Canada

    Should we split each other into a bunch of identity groups squabbling over the spoils? Or should we stress our common values and do our best to make sure that everybody has a fair shot? Must we claim, as lots of people do, that Canada is rotten with every kind of “ism” and phobia? Or can we acknowledge that we really are a pretty fair and just society that’s trying to do better? … I believe the way forward should be rooted in pride and confidence, not accusations and shame.

  • Later Retirement versus Higher Immigration as Remedies for an Aging Population

    Increasing the age at which Canadians typically cease work and access benefits such as pensions is a far more practical and powerful tool to mitigate the economic and fiscal stresses of aging… Safeguarding our living standards and public programs against the stresses of aging requires other tools – in particular, rewards for people who stay economically active into their 60s and beyond. If we foster longer working life and address other challenges facing our pensions and healthcare, we will handle demographic change much better

  • Immigration alone can’t keep Canada young

    If longer work life and other responses to aging makes us more prosperous, however, we will more easily attract immigrants and retain workers who can contribute to our prosperity – a virtuous circle.
    Higher immigration may be good for many reasons, but it cannot keep Canada young. Other policies to ease the demographic transition, notably encouraging people to work longer, hold out at least as much promise for boosting living standards.

  • Social conservatives savour victory, thank immigrants

    … for most social conservatives, religion is the motivating factor in their political mobilization. More than half a million Muslims immigrated to Canada in the 20 years to 2011… Almost 200,000 Filipino immigrants came to Canada in the five years to 2016, replenishing the pews of the country’s Catholic churches. As with most Canadian Muslims, these Filipino newcomers take their faith ultraseriously… “religious identity and practice are important and growing, in contrast to the broader secularizing trend in Canada.”

  • Liberals hatch plan to stop Trumpism: fix income inequality

    Canada’s foreign affairs minister, Chrystia Freeland… has penned an article about how Canada plans to battle global trends toward nationalism and protectionism. She calls it “progressive internationalism” and describes how Canada will be pursuing this idea in 2018 on two tracks: internationally, in the realms of human rights, immigration and freer trade; and domestically, with fairer taxation and improved labour standards here in Canada… Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne is also in the midst of a large-scale effort to battle economic inequality

  • The talk Canada needs: Are we importing inequality?

    How did middle-class Peel suddenly become poor? … At the centre of Peel is Brampton, which is growing at three times the rate of Canada. Brampton, now the ninth-largest city in Canada, is a magnet for new immigrants… Many people will argue that low income among immigrants is due to discrimination against newcomers and fraying social safety nets. But it is also due to insufficient language skills, poorer credentials (even if they seem good on paper), and the lack of social networks and local knowledge of a culture that take years to establish.

  • It’s been wrong for Canada to separate families

    Under section 38(1)c of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, Immigration Canada can refuse any applicant who might “cause excessive demand on health or social services.” Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen announced Wednesday that the government will be looking at how to let go of the excessive demand provision. “From a principled perspective, the current excessive demand provision policy simply does not align with our country’s values of inclusion of person with disabilities in Canadian society.”