• Financial information of universities and degree-granting colleges, 2015/2016

    Canada’s 150 public universities and degree-granting institutions spent $27.1 billion in 2015/2016, up from $26.8 billion in 2014/2015. Revenues fell from $28.4 billion in 2014/2015 to $27.2 billion in 2015/2016… The proportion of provincial funding decreased from 41.5% in 2010/2011 to 39.1% in 2015/2016… The proportion of revenues from tuition fees has grown from 21.5% in 2010/2011 to 27.9% in 2015/2016.

  • The Great Minimum Wage Debate: How to Balance Good Intentions and Evidence

    As a whole, they show a range of results, with many showing small to no effects on employment from small wage hikes while others show negative effects among youth and new immigrants.
    A further complication is that industries with the highest concentration of minimum wage workers are also the ones with higher potential for automation… no one can predict with confidence the exact effects from Ontario’s aggressive move from $11.60 to $14.00 per hour next January, and then to $15.00 per hour in 2019.

  • Why I will celebrate Canada Day

    We have long been a work in progress… Our highest court of appeal rested in Britain until 1949. Our Constitution was not patriated until 1982… By modern standards, Canada has not always acted in an enlightened fashion… Far too often its treatment of Indigenous peoples has been shameful. But not always. In recent decades, the courts in particular have been mindful of Indigenous rights. This is all part of our history. We have to recognize it and deal with it.

  • Never forget the lessons of Europe’s concentration camps

    It is time to remind ourselves why we developed such a passionate and, we thought, unshakeable commitment to democracy and human rights, to remember the three lessons we were supposed to have learned from the concentration camps of Europe: Indifference is injustice’s incubator; it’s not just what you stand for, it’s what you stand up for; and we can never forget how the world looks to those who are vulnerable.

  • Don’t blame foreign workers when the problem is locals who prefer EI over working

    … between December 2015 and September 2016… 67,440 temporary foreign workers were granted access to Canada to work in areas where unemployed Canadians with relevant prior work experience lived close by. That isn’t how the system is supposed to work. The temporary foreign worker program is meant to be a last resort for employers; the EI program is intended to be a safety net, not a permanent crutch.

  • Anti-Muslim hatred has no place in my Canada

    Like it or not, religious accommodation is the law, and the schools are devoted to inclusiveness. Our interest is to integrate new Canadians, not segregate them. We want their children to be educated in the public schools, not religious schools. So we’d better make sure the kids (and parents) feel comfortable there… We won’t always agree, especially over symbols that touch our deepest values. Let’s just hope we can keep finding ways to disagree politely.

  • Liberals pledge $5-billion for training, employment in 2017 federal budget

    Under the federal budget, unemployed people who want to use government-funded training programs will not have to give up their EI benefits. New loans and grants for adult students are designed to help a wider range of people, such as parents who want to return to the workforce and those who are victims of shrinking industries… women will be able to claim EI maternity benefits earlier in their pregnancy, starting at 12 weeks before the due date.

  • Why Discrimination Is a Public Health Issue

    … black and Indigenous children are more likely to be placed in foster care and remain in care longer. They are more likely to drop out of school. In Ontario, they are three times more likely to be incarcerated than non-blacks… The high mortality rate of black men and women is traumatizing and takes an emotional and psychological toll because we see our brothers, sisters and fathers in the victims. “The thing is that as a community, when one bleeds, we all do…”

  • Canadian citizenship must be a constitutional right

    Particularly heinous is the untold number of Indigenous Canadians that are currently stateless because their parents never registered their births, rightfully fearing their children would be sent to a residential school. Now adults, these Canadians have no rights or benefits. They are citizens of nowhere, unable to legally work, marry, attend school, buy a home, get a loan, drive a car or even take a bus, train or plane without identification.

  • Open the doors

    Economic-class immigrants, who gain entry into Canada primarily in recognition of their marketable skills, education, work experience and official-language fluency; family-reunification immigrants… and refugees. Statscan data show that skilled workers in the economic class earn very close to the national median after two years in the country, but family-class newcomers earn, on average, more than 40 per cent less… Government-sponsored refugees earn more than 60 per cent below the national median.