• Paying MDs more won’t help

    Some access and wait-times are better since the 1980s, but not because there are more physicians getting higher fees. Success has mainly come through common-sense reorganization and by replacing physician-centred models of medical care with patient-centred models, often involving fewer physicians but other more appropriate professionals… other factors matter more to our health… security in housing and food, good education, adequate income.

  • Better medicare the prescription for Ontario

    Calls for user fees on top of what the government already pays us, and arguments to let rich Ontarians pay for faster services, undermine values shared by most doctors and patients. Not to mention, they also fly in the face of the evidence. Besides violating the Canada Health Act and Ontario’s own laws, user fees and similar charges disproportionately impact those least able to pay, who also happen to be the Ontarians most in need of care.

  • Don’t let seniors’ care become a private equity money maker

    Research shows that the typical business model for such arrangements is associated with offering a high return on capital and maximizing cash extraction. The property assets owned by the private equity firm are separated from the daily operations of providing resident care… The evidence is clear: Large-scale private equity investments in nursing home facilities too often jeopardize the quality of care and put seniors’ health at risk.

  • Prescription from ER doctor: expand public dental programs

    … they come to the hospital because they have nowhere else to go. For children in low income families, we have a public dental program called Healthy Smiles Ontario. For anyone over age 17 (including seniors), we have nothing… there were almost 61,000 visits to emergency departments in Ontario for dental problems in 2015, or one visit every nine minutes… Based on the average cost of an emergency room visit, the Association of Ontario Health Centres estimates it costs the province at least $31 million annually.

  • Canada must make sure everyone pays fair share of taxes

    The Conference Board of Canada now estimates that the federal government is missing out on uncollected taxes that amount to at least $16 billion a year – and might even be as high as $47.8 billion… That’s enough, for example, to pay Canada’s entire defence budget more than twice over. It’s almost 10 times more than the estimated cost of a national childcare program.

  • Ottawa should not delay on action to fight poverty

    … much more must be done to ensure EI reflects the shifting reality of work and is adequate to the current cost of living… Some 170,000 households are currently waiting for [public housing] units, with the average wait time at around four years… the day-care situation remains dire. This situation robs too many people, particularly mothers, of the opportunity to work or train… a refundable version of the [disability tax] credit… would be a far more effective tool for helping those with disabilities who need it the most.

  • Learning black history makes Canadians better

    With black Canadians at just three per cent of the population, we’ve heard the argument that Black History Month is less relevant than commemorating the larger Indigenous or South Asian community’s respective histories. But Black History Month doesn’t come at the expense of others. In fact, learning about the black Canadian experience builds empathy; it doesn’t divide it.

  • Unfounded sexual assault cases: A human-rights issue

    The OHRC has made enforcing human rights in the criminal-justice system one of its key priorities for the next three to five years. We are also committed to promoting a human-rights culture through education – to address and eliminate, at the source, the kinds of stereotypes that may be behind some of these statistics. This is about our humanity and the true meaning of equal justice for all. Sexual-assault survivors must be taken seriously.

  • Ottawa Should Reveal $16 billion in Hidden Spending

    Greater visibility in budgets, estimates and public accounts would not make such preferences disappear – plenty of programs that do show as spending in these documents have persisted for decades, and have expanded… changes to the reporting of tax preferences that show their spending equivalents would give Canadians a valuable tool to improve federal fiscal policy.

  • Hysteria from Conservatives over harmless motion on Islamophobia

    We live in a time both of much more widespread and open expressions of racism — thanks, internet — and of acute hypersensitivity to rude or even frank speech of all kinds. Each feeds off the other. But the alternative to “political correctness” is not bigotry and intolerance, and the answer to racism is not censorship. Indeed, we have too much of that already… The burden of proof is always on those who wish to restrict freedom to show why they must.