• How we implement basic income will define our future

    In Western economies… pre-retirement assistance is an increasingly dysfunctional patchwork of schemes. Some are directed at certain groups while ignoring others. Many are tied to employment… We’re coming back to UBI now because the “social contract” between employers and workers lies in ruins. The decline of unions has consigned powerless workers to exploitative workplaces. And the tax system has been perverted to liberate the wealthiest 1 per cent from paying their fair share.

  • Why Morneau got cold feet over ridding Canada of tax credits

    To combat a structural problem requires a structural solution… First… An independent committee can be tasked with delivering a bundle of reforms to be accepted or rejected as a whole… Second, the process should deliver a clear and transparent benefit to all taxpayers… Third, any new tax measure should by law become subject to a mandatory review for effectiveness after a set number of years.

  • Canada’s approach to board diversity needs a rethink

    Women made up 12 per cent of all board seats examined in the study, up 1 percentage point from 11 per cent in 2015… The dissatisfaction with the current regulatory regime highlights the need to consider mandatory quotas… the CSA found that only 9 per cent of companies have internal targets for women on their boards, with a mere 2 per cent having targets for women in executive positions.

  • Tax Fairness? Maybe Next Year, Say Liberals

    Closing unfair and ineffective tax loopholes could have raised $16 billion. They failed to deliver, again, on their election promise to end the stock options deduction that gives almost a billion dollars to some of the richest people in Canada. They failed to make the tax system simpler or fairer… How long before regular taxpayers conclude that the promise of fair system was an empty one?

  • Liberals defer major tax pledge in 2017 federal budget

    … Ottawa chose to hold off on a campaign pledge to raise billions in new revenue by closing tax loopholes that benefit high-income Canadians… But Mr. Morneau is promising to present a paper later this year that will outline potential tax changes that could affect upper-income earners, particularly those who use corporate structures to pay less tax… the Liberals are now setting their sights on private business structures that still allow couples to split income for tax purposes.

  • Liberals pledge $5-billion for training, employment in 2017 federal budget

    Under the federal budget, unemployed people who want to use government-funded training programs will not have to give up their EI benefits. New loans and grants for adult students are designed to help a wider range of people, such as parents who want to return to the workforce and those who are victims of shrinking industries… women will be able to claim EI maternity benefits earlier in their pregnancy, starting at 12 weeks before the due date.

  • Federal budget to show how infrastructure bank can attract, free up investment

    A new infrastructure bank could free up billions in new money for social services Canadians regularly use, internal government documents say — provided the experimental new institution meets its lofty financing goals… Funding for social infrastructure projects, which tend to be less attractive to private investors, could increase by one-third if the bank meets its target of leveraging $4 in private investment for every $1 from the federal government

  • A man who’ll stand up for the rights of other men (and boys) on campus and in society

    … 13 years ago, it really was an orphan topic. Nobody could get their heads around the truth, upheld by a mountain of credible data, that almost as many men suffer from intimate partner violence as women do, violence right up to the most extreme level, and including knifings, burnings and pushing down stairs… Hard-line feminists continue to see men who believe they can also be victims and who want to talk about their victimhood as a threat to women’s interests.

  • Getting to the root of Ontario’s family law mess

    … Ontario’s family law system is utterly broken… How is it that these courts remain the expensive, convoluted, soul-crushing places they have become and how is that the players have allowed it to become normalized? … the lawyers involved, who have a duty to act in the best interests of the child and so often don’t. And judges ostensibly have control of their courtrooms; why won’t they exert it?

  • The Case Against Policy Advocacy Deregulation

    There are certainly cases in which charities have played a productive role in changing public policy for the better — successful campaigns to combat smoking and drunk driving come readily to mind. And though these contributions have produced clearly beneficial results, it does not necessarily follow that the general regulatory framework should be relaxed or amended to allow charities to engage more actively in public policymaking.