• Ontario’s cities need a new approach to homelessness

    The system seems to simply move from crisis to crisis with minimal evidence of strategic or long-term thinking… Under this model, Ontario government would issue a call for proposals to its municipal partners and flow new funding based on bids by municipal governments to achieve real measurable outcomes… fewer people in core-housing need, fewer people on the waiting lists for social housing, and a reduction and ultimate elimination of homelessness.

  • An affordable place to call home

    Field of Dreams, located in Elmira, Ont., gives people with intellectual disabilities the opportunity to live independently in their own homes. That’s far better than the institutions they were once shut away in and the group homes with full-time oversight that have largely replaced those institutions. Their independent living is assisted by tenants in the same small apartment complexes who take on the role of “good neighbours.” They’re on hand to provide a little help when needed in exchange for more affordable rent.

  • Ottawa takes an important first step on Inuit welfare

    The federal government’s promise, announced last week, that it will eradicate tuberculosis from Inuit communities by 2030 (and reduce its occurrence by 50 per cent by 2025) shows a welcome and overdue seriousness about a tragic problem that has for too long been ignored. But to succeed the government will have to make a real dent in socio-economic problems on which it has often talked big but failed to deliver.

  • How to make Ontario’s Budget 2018 the Income Security Budget

    Budget 2018 can deliver greater prosperity by increasing support to low-income workers, unpaid family carers, and those excluded from the labour market. In particular, Maytree offers recommendations in four areas: Modernizing Ontario’s response to working poverty… Protecting the poorest from falling further behind… Delivering housing affordability by investing in supply and demand… renewing investment in care and carers

  • The high cost of Canada’s increasing wealth inequality

    More than 61 per cent of the rise in total household net assets since 2005 is related to real estate… given that real estate has played such a major role in wealth accumulation, policies that make housing more affordable through expanding supply warrant special consideration. Another approach to reducing the wealth gap is increasing financial literacy, since people with greater financial knowledge are more likely to make better decisions with their money.

  • Find permanent housing for the homeless

    … the answer to homelessness isn’t emergency shelters. It’s ensuring there is affordable accommodation so people don’t find themselves on the doorsteps of emergency shelters or, worse, on the street. To do that the city needs the help of Premier Kathleen Wynne and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Both could immediately begin to ease the city’s chronic housing shortage by funding two programs that are already in the works.

  • Federal Government Back with Big Dollars for Housing ‘This is very significant.’

    Canada signed and ratified the 1976 United Nations’ International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), which recognizes “the right of everyone to an adequate standard of living for himself and his family, including adequate food, clothing and housing, and to the continuous improvement of living conditions.” However, the right to housing has not been replicated in Canadian law and cannot be enforced. The strategy said the federal government will “introduce a bill to enable new legislation that promotes a human rights-based approach to housing.”

  • Federal government looks to provinces for billions to support housing plan

    The main new initiative announced on Wednesday is a $4-billion Canada Housing Benefit, which would provide rent support for about 300,000 low-income households and would begin in 2020. Ottawa expects the provinces to cover half of the cost… Ottawa is also responding to one of the most pressing concerns raised by Canada’s cities, offering $4.8-billion to address the fact that many long-standing social-housing agreements with Ottawa were scheduled to expire over the coming years.

  • Ottawa’s housing plan will create 100,000 new housing units nationally

    The measures… include: $2 billion for a new Canada Housing Benefit to provide funding directly to low-income families and individuals… $2.2 billion to expand and extend the homelessness partnering strategy… New legislation to require future federal governments to maintain a national housing strategy… The federal government also recognizes that housing is a human right, for the first time.

  • Ontario urged to make ending child poverty an election issue

    Children and families who are Indigenous, racialized, newcomers, living with disabilities or in lone-parent, female-led households experience much higher rates of poverty, according to the 2016 census… almost 16 per cent of children in Canada were living in poverty in 1989 when Parliament unanimously pledged to end child poverty by 2000. But due to lack of federal action on the promise, child poverty in Canada rose to 22.3 per cent in 2000.