• How postmodernism is infiltrating public life and policy

    People who produce facts – scientists, reporters, witnesses – do so from a particular social position… They rely on non-neutral methods… to communicate facts to people who receive, interpret and deploy them from their own social positions … Truth is not found, but made, and making truth means exercising power.” … The right has cottoned on to [these ideas] because they are useful, from a Machiavellian perspective.

  • A short history of the poverty-busting power of basic income

    The idea of a minimum or basic income has been around for almost 500 years… But, now it’s the international darling once again. Pilot projects are planned or underway in almost a dozen countries in both the developed and underdeveloped world in response to concern that globalization and technological advances are leaving large swaths of the population behind.

  • It’s past time to protect the ‘precariat’

    Two new studies paint bleak portraits of the economic circumstances of young workers and others struggling to get by in the new economy. Together, they suggest that while governments may not want or be able to stop the evolution now underway, they must move quickly to address widening gaps in worker protections, lest the better part of a generation fall through the cracks… governments can’t and shouldn’t want to stop innovation. But neither are they powerless to shape it or to protect workers from its worst consequences.

  • Amnesty International honours Canada’s Indigenous-rights movement

    Amnesty International describes the Ambassador of Conscience Award as its highest honour, given annually to those who show courage in standing up to injustice. In announcing the award, Amnesty underlined the fact that although they live in a prosperous country, Canada’s Indigenous peoples are “consistently among the most marginalized members of society.”

  • No evidence that ‘Canada works’ in new internal free trade deal

    Not only are whole sectors walled off for future negotiations (financial services, alcohol) or simply excluded (supply management) but more than half of the 329-page agreement… is taken up listing all the other exceptions insisted upon by one government or another. Even the chapters devoted to freeing trade are riddled with limitations, caveats and exemptions…

  • Free trade within Canada gets a boost from new deal

    Critics have long complained Canada has better free trade deals with other countries than within its own borders… The centerpiece… is a framework that will help provinces and territories agree on joint regulations and harmonization of standards. “That’s going to help make Canada one of the easiest places in the world in which to do business. It’s going to make us more competitive. It’s going to create jobs,”

  • Trump’s ‘leaked’ NAFTA letter is a gift to Canada

    Ironically, half the things the United States is demanding of Canada and Mexico (e.g. access to local government procurement, meeting international labour standards) would be on Canada’s list, too. “Transparency, efficiency and predictability,” “fair, equitable non-discriminatory access,” “eliminate artificial or trade-distorting barriers to investment.”… trade negotiations do not take place in a vacuum… Does the United States want a failed state on its southern border? Does the United States need Canada’s support here or there on the world stage for a secure and prosperous North America?

  • Don’t blame foreign workers when the problem is locals who prefer EI over working

    … between December 2015 and September 2016… 67,440 temporary foreign workers were granted access to Canada to work in areas where unemployed Canadians with relevant prior work experience lived close by. That isn’t how the system is supposed to work. The temporary foreign worker program is meant to be a last resort for employers; the EI program is intended to be a safety net, not a permanent crutch.

  • South Africa’s postapartheid journey offers ‘important insights’ for Canada: Justice Minister

    “It is hard to celebrate 150 years of colonialism,” she said in a speech at the University of Cape Town’s law school. “What we need to do is make a 180-degree turn, so that our laws and policies are pointing in the direction of the future of reconciliation and transformation – not the past of colonization.” … South Africa has also created a high-level panel… to assess more than 1,000 post-apartheid laws to see if they do enough to tackle the problems of poverty and inequality… Ms. Wilson-Raybould met the former president to see what she can learn from the panel’s work

  • Liberals defer major tax pledge in 2017 federal budget

    … Ottawa chose to hold off on a campaign pledge to raise billions in new revenue by closing tax loopholes that benefit high-income Canadians… But Mr. Morneau is promising to present a paper later this year that will outline potential tax changes that could affect upper-income earners, particularly those who use corporate structures to pay less tax… the Liberals are now setting their sights on private business structures that still allow couples to split income for tax purposes.