• Liberals defer major tax pledge in 2017 federal budget

    … Ottawa chose to hold off on a campaign pledge to raise billions in new revenue by closing tax loopholes that benefit high-income Canadians… But Mr. Morneau is promising to present a paper later this year that will outline potential tax changes that could affect upper-income earners, particularly those who use corporate structures to pay less tax… the Liberals are now setting their sights on private business structures that still allow couples to split income for tax purposes.

  • Policy-makers should pay attention to world happiness rankings

    That’s the whole purpose of the happiness report. To raise the awareness that there are these scientifically replicable measures of the quality of life that don’t give you the same answers as GDP and don’t invite the same policies that maximizing GDP would mean… If these numbers are taken seriously, it’s to raise the level of policy awareness and discussion.”

  • Safeguard Disability Rights – Sign The Un Protocol

    With great fanfare in 2010, the Harper government ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). However, it never took the next step of ratifying its Optional Protocol, which is essential for holding Canada accountable for its commitment… Over 26,000 Canadians are looking forward to having Prime Minister Trudeau safeguard disability rights by signing and ratifying the Protocol by the end of 2017.

  • Canada Without Poverty, the UN and Human Rights

    In March-April 2017, Canada will be reviewed for its compliance with the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Canada ratified the Convention in 2010 which makes this the first review cycle that applies to Canada… The first step is to provide a written submission to the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. For NGOs, the written submission details ongoing issues and concerns about the state’s human rights record.

  • Canada’s 150th year could be as pivotal as 1867 and 1967

    Canada confronts five big economic challenges: · to live within its means; · to achieve stronger productivity improvement; · to expand the globally competitive supply side of its economy; · to make itself more competitive globally in terms of risk/reward opportunity for the best people; and · to do something bold… to help better match greater private-sector strength with better public-sector infrastructure… to build solid and desirable personal lives in a country that combines dynamism with calm and common sense.

  • The High Price of Equality

    An expert in ancient history, Scheidel takes Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century and shows that its findings are applicable throughout human history (and prehistory)… he sees no way to achieve equality peacefully. Perhaps he’s right. It may be that the sure prospect of living a longer, healthier, happier life among equals isn’t good enough for those who want to be rich at any cost to others and themselves.

  • What do working German women have that Canadians don’t? Lots of help from above

    Women in Canada… are working about as much as they can under the limitations of the Canadian system… The amount of free or highly subsidized all-day child care remains extremely limited (except in Quebec). There are few incentives for companies to move women from part-time into full-time employment while maintaining family-friendly hours. The tax system remains more favourable toward one-income families. The pay gap between men and women remains astonishingly large…

  • Ontario nursing homes feed seniors on $8.33 a day

    The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care sets the per-day food amount, which currently sits at $8.33. It did move up from $7.80 in 2014 but there is still no guarantee of an increase. The ministry has marginally improved food funding over the past few years (without an annual commitment to do so), but the ongoing struggle to give residents healthy and culturally appealing meals is well documented.

  • To close the gender wage gap, men must vocally support more equality

    … wage equality not only benefits corporate growth, but also promotes global economic prosperity… We still haven’t shaken off the preconceived notion that gender equality is solely a woman’s issue fought by women for women, which in turn keeps breeding the problem. If men are not actively engaged in overcoming gender inequality, how can we ever achieve wage parity?

  • Growing number of migrants renouncing Canadian immigrant status

    A large number of these are so-called astronaut parents, who work offshore while their spouses and school-attending children remain in Canada, usually in urban centres… “Some have bought multiple properties. By renouncing their permanent resident status they can stay below the radar and avoid Canadian taxes… “They can visit Canada whenever they want on a 10-year visa. Why would they want anything else?”