• Why can’t Canada keep up on child care?

    According to OECD recommendations, Ottawa should be spending 1 per cent of Canada’s GDP on child care. Our government currently invests only 0.25 per cent. By quadrupling our federal investment, we would both make child care more affordable and improve the quality of programs through supporting the education and training of early childhood educators. It would improve pay and benefits to the child care workforce – those compassionate people who care lovingly, creatively and professionally for children and who are so instrumental in their development.

  • For foster kids to succeed, they need more than just care

    … when the system parents 17,000 individuals in Ontario (and about 70,000 nationwide), and channels them on the same bleak life trajectory, the issue is systemic… Our system has stagnated in the “activity trap” by focusing on activities and outputs rather than outcomes or impact measurement on youth who have gone through the protection system. In Ontario, and most Canadian jurisdictions, youth outcomes after care have never been tracked.

  • Why this unbeliever is happy to celebrate Christmas

    The truth is that our society has been given its moral principles by Christianity, and those principles shape us, whether we are committed to a religion or not. Christian feelings enter in the moral air we breathe and find a comfortable home within us. We believe we should see the welfare of others as at least as important as our own. We should treat everyone fairly… If we go out of our way to smooth the path of minorities, we are reflecting the same feelings.

  • Canada needs tax reform. Here’s where Ottawa should look to improve the system

    So what should be the focus of tax reform? … corporate-personal income tax integration… The Carter Royal Commission… “comprehensive limits” proposal [re. retirement savings]… “A buck is a buck is a buck.” … Major improvements in enforcement against tax evasion… and even in detecting serious tax avoidance strategies… But tax cuts themselves are not tax reform… base broadening would be… a logical complement to a reduction in tax rates.

  • Access to early childhood programs is as important as primary education

    The most important dimensions for policy makers to tackle are enrolment rates and the duration that children receive ECE programming. These are key factors tied to better future academic scores, and they are the areas where Canada falls well below the standards in other advanced countries… Ensuring all Canadian children aged 3 to 5 have access to full-day education would come at a cost… However, the economic benefit derived from this investment would exceed the outlay… as high as $6 for every dollar invested.

  • It’s time to fix medicare’s innovation problem

    The basic problem is that the way we finance and deliver health care in our country hasn’t changed all that much… the federal-provincial framework for medicare hasn’t moved beyond covering hospitals and doctors. For drugs and many important services, we have a national patchwork with gaping holes. Extending coverage is harder without integrated financing… CMMI is the source of ideas like bundling all payments to hospitals and professionals alike when financing complex services that bridge hospitals and homes

  • Ottawa pushes venture capitalists to fix startup gender gap as condition of $400-million funding

    Ottawa is pushing venture capitalists to help fix the gender gap in the Canadian startup scene, telling those who want to qualify for a $400-million funding program they must “demonstrate how their strategies would advance these objectives.” … “We are sending an important signal we believe that … diversity is important and that in itself can lead to better returns,”Ottawa pushes venture capitalists to fix startup gender gap as condition of $400-million funding

  • Quebec to inject $3 billion into anti-poverty program

    Individuals with a limited capacity to work… By 2023… will see their annual government assistance jump from $12,749 to $18,029, which will bring their income up to the poverty threshold. Quebec will pay a total of $1.2 billion to provide them with a basic income (or guaranteed minimum income), separate from rules imposed in the social assistance program. People deemed fit to work will continue to operate under the current social assistance system, with training and job search bonuses subsidized to varying degrees.

  • Most mental-health patients don’t get timely psychiatric care in Ontario, study finds

    Basically, the system allows for the most expensive and highly trained experts in the field to provide long-term, psychological treatment to people who may not need it – while the most severely ill wait in line for even an initial consultation… in countries such as Britain and Australia… psychiatrists serve almost exclusively as consultants, provide continuing care for the most severe mental illnesses, and are paid significantly less to provide talk therapy.

  • Find permanent housing for the homeless

    … the answer to homelessness isn’t emergency shelters. It’s ensuring there is affordable accommodation so people don’t find themselves on the doorsteps of emergency shelters or, worse, on the street. To do that the city needs the help of Premier Kathleen Wynne and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Both could immediately begin to ease the city’s chronic housing shortage by funding two programs that are already in the works.