• How we implement basic income will define our future

    In Western economies… pre-retirement assistance is an increasingly dysfunctional patchwork of schemes. Some are directed at certain groups while ignoring others. Many are tied to employment… We’re coming back to UBI now because the “social contract” between employers and workers lies in ruins. The decline of unions has consigned powerless workers to exploitative workplaces. And the tax system has been perverted to liberate the wealthiest 1 per cent from paying their fair share.

  • Why Morneau got cold feet over ridding Canada of tax credits

    To combat a structural problem requires a structural solution… First… An independent committee can be tasked with delivering a bundle of reforms to be accepted or rejected as a whole… Second, the process should deliver a clear and transparent benefit to all taxpayers… Third, any new tax measure should by law become subject to a mandatory review for effectiveness after a set number of years.

  • Canada’s approach to board diversity needs a rethink

    Women made up 12 per cent of all board seats examined in the study, up 1 percentage point from 11 per cent in 2015… The dissatisfaction with the current regulatory regime highlights the need to consider mandatory quotas… the CSA found that only 9 per cent of companies have internal targets for women on their boards, with a mere 2 per cent having targets for women in executive positions.

  • Policy-makers should pay attention to world happiness rankings

    That’s the whole purpose of the happiness report. To raise the awareness that there are these scientifically replicable measures of the quality of life that don’t give you the same answers as GDP and don’t invite the same policies that maximizing GDP would mean… If these numbers are taken seriously, it’s to raise the level of policy awareness and discussion.”

  • Canada’s 150th year could be as pivotal as 1867 and 1967

    Canada confronts five big economic challenges: · to live within its means; · to achieve stronger productivity improvement; · to expand the globally competitive supply side of its economy; · to make itself more competitive globally in terms of risk/reward opportunity for the best people; and · to do something bold… to help better match greater private-sector strength with better public-sector infrastructure… to build solid and desirable personal lives in a country that combines dynamism with calm and common sense.

  • Increase funding for a national child care program

    Experts say Ottawa is planning to spend $500 million a year for the next 10 years to build a child care network across the country. As much as that is, it’s far from the 1 per cent of GDP experts say is necessary to build a quality system… while three-quarters of mothers of young children are in the workforce, there are licensed spots available for less than a quarter of children under 5. And those that are available are incredibly expensive.

  • A leader to improve our legal system

    In addition to expanding the role of paralegals, the government could transfer many basic legal issues such as employment and motor vehicle claims from the courts to speedier and more efficient administrative tribunals. It could review legislation to reduce reliance on lawyers altogether through proven innovations such as expanding no-fault compensation for accident victims and installing default safeguards in real estate and testamentary transactions.

  • Ottawa should end unfair and ineffective tax breaks

    Every year, the federal government forgoes about $100 billion through so-called tax expenditures… [The Minister should eliminate]: 1. The tax break on executive stock options… half a billion dollars of forgone revenue to subsidize 75 very rich people … 2. The tax credit on corporate dividends… skewed toward the rich… and 3. The Canada Education Savings Grant… the $900-million annual grant disproportionately benefits the well-off.

  • Ontario welcomes new 10-year health accord with Ottawa

    Ontario will receive an additional $2.3 billion for home care — including money for infrastructure improvements — and $1.9 billion more for mental health initiatives over the next decade… “The burden of mental illness and addictions is one and a half times that of cancer and seven times that of all infectious diseases” … “Helping Ontarians maintain their mental wellness, cope with daily mental health challenges or diagnosed illnesses can drive cost savings for the entire health system.”

  • Time to recognize Indigenous people as one of Canada’s founders

    As we celebrate the 150th year of Confederation surely it is time to recognize that Aboriginal Peoples are intrinsic to what we are as a country. It would be a symbolic gesture but it would go a long way to recognizing and embracing the idea that First Nations have always been much more than refugees in their own country.