• 7 things the Census teaches us about income inequality

    Ontario is becoming more polarized. The labour market might be rewarding families in the upper end of the income spectrum, but the bottom half of families raising children in Ontario saw its share of earnings fall to 19 per cent of the income pie… While income inequality hasn’t gotten dramatically worse since the Great Recession of 2008-09 — most of the damage happened between 1976-2006 — it’s not magically reversing on its own. It will take public policies to help close the gap.

  • Should doctors be paid a salary?

    Private, fee-for-service practice does not reflect the needs of a modern health-care system, which requires team-based care that focuses on patient outcomes, not piecemeal work. It also does not make financial sense to physicians anymore, who have no access to benefits, such as vacation, parental leave or pensions, and due to both price regulation and prohibition of private care, can neither adjust prices nor find alternative sources of revenue to cover increasing practice costs… it’s a failing business model.

  • Why Bill Morneau’s tax reform plan is politically necessary

    For Trudeau, tax reform is the necessary adjunct to free trade. As he said once to the Star editorial board, liberalized trade may create wealth but it does so unevenly. The trick is to share the gains from globalization more equitably. The mechanism for doing this is tax reform. Which is why the Liberals promised, in their 2015 election platform, to take aim at tax breaks that favour the rich.

  • Income grows in resource-rich provinces, Ontario and Quebec lag behind

    All told, 4.8 million people in Canada were considered as living in low income in 2015, compared with 4.3 million in 2005. Though the rate was little changed, the poverty shifted among regions and age groups. More seniors are living in low income, while the share of the youngest children in low-income households fell. The rate of seniors in low income climbed to 14.5 per cent from 12 per cent a decade ago. By province, low-income shares… rose to 14.4 per cent from 12.9 per cent.

  • Canadian incomes jump, Ontario residents hit by manufacturing downturn: Statistics Canada

    Canadian incomes have risen by more than 10 per cent over the last decade, fuelled by a booming resource sector, while the number living on low incomes is rising in Ontario where growth has been sluggish, Statistics Canada says… the downturn in the manufacturing sector slowed income growth and the proportion of low-income residents has been on the rise… Across Ontario, 14.4 per cent of residents — some 1.9 million people — were low income in 2015, an increase from 12.9 per cent in 2005.

  • Good jobs improve health and profits

    Bill 148 plans to increase the minimum wage to $15/hour and guarantees 10 personal emergency leave days a year (of which two are paid) for all Ontario workers, among other measures. These are exactly the types of policies we need to start seeing more of, and it is wonderful to see businesses also advocating for a healthy workforce and a healthier Ontario.

  • Our incomes may have grown, but lower earners are still losing

    The census tells a tale of amazing prosperity for the already well-to-do, with individual incomes for those standing at the top one per cent growing by 48 per cent since 1985… One in seven, that’s also the fraction of Canadians living in what Statistics Canada carefully calls “low income.” … one in seven is exactly the fraction of low-income Canadians recorded in the 2005 census.

  • Rising incomes aren’t being shared as widely as they should

    In fact, the share of Canadians living in low-income households actually increased slightly to 14.2 per cent (that’s 4.8 million people) from 14 per cent in 2005. Seniors fared the worst, with 14.5 per cent living in poverty, up from 12 per cent in the previous decade. And while the percentage of children living in poverty was down slightly to 17.8 from 18.8 per cent, the picture is still alarming.

  • Ontario must toughen law to protect temporary workers

    … as it stands now hiring through temp agencies limits companies’ liability for accidents on the job, reduces their responsibility for making sure that employees’ legal rights are respected, and cuts costs — all at the expense of workers’ safety and earnings. The legislation now before the Ontario legislature does not address these concerns. As a result, the growing trend toward hiring temp workers — creating an increase in precarious work — may continue unabated.

  • Canadian tech leaders warn new tax rules may hinder startups, innovation agenda

    A common concern is the risk that Canada will become less competitive with the United States in terms of overall taxation, influencing corporate decisions over which side of the border to locate or expand… “We have to push back and say, ‘No, we’re going to stay in Canada.’ But you know what? If I don’t have any opportunity of actually cashing out in Canada, I will move down to the States and I’ll take all the jobs with me,”