• Ontario makes bold promise on autism treatment

    The new Ontario autism program will give all children under 18 years of age diagnosed with the developmental disorder access to the treatment they require when they need it… The age, severity of autism symptoms and the presence of coexisting diagnoses will no longer affect the eligibility for therapy… Each child’s treatment needs will be determined by a licensed clinician, not cold and blunt program guidelines or funding availability… parents will be able to hire qualified therapists or choose government services.

  • Doctors tortured patients at Ontario mental-health centre, judge rules

    Patients at a maximum-security mental-health facility in Ontario were tortured by medical doctors over a 17-year period in unethical and degrading human experiments, a judge has ruled in a lawsuit. The techniques used on the patients between 1966 and 1983 included solitary confinement, as treatment and as punishment; the administration of hallucinogens and delirium-producing drugs, including LSD; and brainwashing methods developed by the CIA

  • National Child Data Strategy: Results of a Feasibility Study

    While ‘strategy’ may be too broad, key informants identified strong support for continued work on child data so long as it is clearly defined, does not duplicate existing efforts and is shaped by key players in the field. Next steps include: mapping key data initiatives, creating opportunities for conversation, creating opportunities for learning, supporting data collection, and supporting engagement and knowledge translation.

  • Demand for youth mental health services is exploding. How universities and business are scrambling to react

    … it should not be the responsibility of post-secondary institutions to provide mental health services. It is their job is to provide education… The province this month announced $6 million in additional annual funding to support mental health services at Ontario’s colleges and universities… But with 44 post-secondary institutions… experts say it’s not enough. One-time funding for interventions isn’t a long-term fix

  • WSIB cutting costs at expense of workers’ health, report says

    Ontario’s worker compensation board is saving money by reducing spending on drug benefits for workplace accident victims and by providing financial incentives to their health-care providers to limit treatment time, a new report compiled by a Toronto-based legal clinic says… Since 2010, the WSIB has sought to reduce its $14 billion unfunded liability, but maintains that health outcomes are improving amongst injured workers.

  • Why has Ontario’s health system abandoned our kids?

    The Ontario government must invest in: Early detection and prevention programs; More psychiatrists and health-care professionals; Specialized residential treatment programs; Post-residential treatment programs; Support for families; Navigation tools to help match people with available treatments; Public awareness in schools, the work place and the community… This is our cry for help and call to action to the government of Ontario.

  • Ontario autism program will soon include direct funding as option

    … the $533-million Ontario Autism Program beginning next month will soon include a direct funding option, something families have long been clamouring for… A government-commissioned analysis about 10 years ago found that the average cost per hour for direct service was $55, versus $37 for direct funding — something Ontario’s auditor general highlighted in a 2013 report.

  • Canada must (and can) take control of drug prices

    … $13.7-billion in patented medicines were sold in this country in 2014; if Canadians had paid the OECD average instead of our own inflated prices, the bill would have been $3.6-billion less… Prices for identical drugs vary between provinces, for no good reason; brand-name drugs are too often prescribed when similarly effective and much cheaper generics would do the job; and generic prices in Canada are also among the highest in the world.

  • Dismantling the Welfare Wall for Persons with Disabilities 

    For most Canadians with disabilities, the promise of the social security system far exceeds its performance, especially for persons with severe impairment. Many cannot qualify for public or private insurance because the eligibility criteria require employment or the programs are delivered as a workplace benefit. Thousands of individuals with serious disabilities end up on social assistance or welfare – the leanest of Canada’s social programs.

  • Ontario Parents want help for their developmentally delayed adult-age children

    Lengthy waiting lists remain for as many as 14,000 families whose children turn 18 and have to reapply for aid as they are cut off from funding they have enjoyed for years… the Liberals have doubled the budget for people with developmental disabilities since taking office in 2003. It now stands at $2.1 billion and last month’s provincial budget would increase that by $677 million