• Purdue Pharma given free reign in Canada as it is sanctioned in the United States

    Several American states have already successfully sued Purdue Pharma and others may follow… We have the same tragic opioid crisis here in Canada relative to the U.S. — 3,000 deaths per year in Canada compared to 30,000 in the United States — and trail only the U.S. when it comes to opioid prescribing rates. But unlike our neighbours, Canadian governments have not taken similar actions against Purdue Pharma. Canadians pay for this inaction.

  • The #metoo moment is important, but don’t forget the last one

    The #metoo moment… is a consciousness-raising fuelled in its reach and breadth by social media. It is a generation of women who feel they were sold a bill of goods when they were told they were equal. They are asking us: “How can this be true when our lives are curtailed by sexual violence?” … Let’s build on the moment of shock and dismay to create an adequately funded national strategy that uses this moment of holding politicians… and leave a changed future for the women and men who follow.

  • After the Sears debacle, why is Ontario making it easier to underfund pensions?

    Leaving retirees to scramble in their golden years is cruel, and it is unconscionable to expect an overtaxed middle class to foot the bill for corporate chicanery. If governments won’t stop companies from dodging their pension obligations, it’s just a matter of time before we see the next Sears Canada. And that’s a prospect that should worry us all.

  • Why the Soulpepper Four skipped the cops and went after Albert Schultz in civil court

    While many a criminal case has floundered trying to overcome the standard of proof beyond a reasonable doubt, civil plaintiffs need only prove their case on a balance of probabilities – more-likely-than-not. Civil cases almost never go to trial, dramatically increasing the prospects that these women will see some sort of negotiated settlement rather than the winner-take-it-all conclusion that is more common in criminal cases.

  • A broken system is harming those with mental illness

    The SIU is investigating how a man suffering from schizophrenia was killed at a police station. “They have absolutely no tools and no awareness to deal with people with mental disability…” … This pattern of racialized, mentally ill men dying at the hands of police and corrections officers must stop. Our elected officials must be held to account for a broken system that releases to us our most vulnerable in body bags.

  • Treatment of women in Canadian prisons a human rights travesty

    “… CSC’s tool to assign women offenders to security levels was designed to assess men, not women. CSC also used this tool to refer women offenders to correctional programs, which is problematic since the tool was not designed for this purpose.” … “being classified as maximum security… limits your access to programs and services… It makes the experience of punishment more onerous and more punitive than it should be.”

  • Women won’t be silenced in 2018

    … sexual assaults and harassment of women would not be so common in the workplace if more women occupied positions of power… the dial on women’s participation on boards of directors, never mind in executive positions, has barely budged. It’s at 21 per cent in Canada, and 20 per cent in the U.S. The same holds true in politics… The percentage of women in the U.S. Congress sits at 20 per cent. It’s 24 per cent in the House of Commons.

  • What the Wilfrid Laurier professors got wrong about Bill C-16 and gender identity discrimination

    C-16 added gender identity and expression as grounds for discrimination under the Canadian Human Rights Act, but this applies to people employed by or receiving services from federally-regulated industries, such as banks or the public service… Universities instead fall under provincial codes — but the Ontario Human Rights Code has included gender identity and expression for five years now, long before Peterson gained fame for his arguments.

  • Stop debating age and actually teach us about consent

    We need to learn that consent can be affected by power dynamics, the influence of substances and perceived safety. In order for us to feel safe and empowered in our decisions, conversations must be constant and reflective of our experience. Education has to start young, acknowledging that consent is not only mandatory for sex but also for any kind of healthy relationship… So, we have to keep talking about it, a thousand times over, until things start to change.

  • Don’t link mental illness with violent crime

    We concluded, as have others before us, that public fears of the mentally ill greatly exceed the actual risk of violence posed by such persons. A small number of people may pose an increased risk to others, but this risk is a result of acute symptoms that can respond to treatment. Policies of social inclusion, stigma reduction and providing people with care are the most important steps to advance the well-being of individuals with mental illness; this may facilitate an even lower risk of violence to others.