• 10 ways Ontario can save half a billion dollars a year

    The incoming administration proposes to conduct a “line-by-line audit of government spending to bring an end to the culture of waste and mismanagement.” If I can find $521-million of annual savings between the couch cushions in under half an hour, then a professional line-item audit of non-public information easily will find billions more in annual savings.

  • Good Intentions, Not Enough Action in Indigenous Child Welfare Plan, Says Advocate

    … many of the prevention programs the government is now pledging to fund don’t currently exist. Additional funding will be needed for capital and start-up costs for new programming to keep kids with their families… “It’s taken us literally generations to get into the circumstances that have led to a severe overrepresentation of Indigenous children in child welfare… So it’s not going to happen overnight, but we’re seeing really positive movement…”

  • What the 2018 election results mean for Ontario’s professors and academic librarians

    The Ontario PC platform was silent on almost all postsecondary issues, and did not provide a plan for postsecondary education in Ontario. It did not include any reference to addressing underfunding for postsecondary education or the need for a faculty renewal strategy in the province. However, the platform statement did emphasize the PC party’s belief that Ontario has a “spending problem”. Such a statement should be of grave concern when it comes to public funding for all public services, including postsecondary education.

  • Virtual Care Key to Modernizing Canada’s Healthcare System

    Answering healthcare’s challenges in the 21st century will not be achieved by having more 20th century buildings. It will come from modernizing our system through the use of new digital tools and integrating them into the day-to-day work of caring for patients… The problem isn’t with the technology, as other industries have made this leap, but rather with outdated regulations, policies and special interest groups which affect everything from privacy to labour negotiations, anchoring our ability to move forward.

  • Now He’s Won, Can Doug Ford Fill Voters’ Desire for ‘Order?’

    With economic upheavals, there is a segment of the population looking for stability and order. Not sharing in economic prosperity, they look to government to slow social change, such as those related to immigration and multiculturalism. Lacking faith in transformative change, they look to politics as a way to deliver small material benefits like a tax cut or cheaper hydro. Holding onto those voters is a fundamental challenge for Ford and his government.

  • Overview of the Progressive Conservative Party’s Healthcare Platform

    The party intends to spend $98 million annually to provide dental care to low-income seniors… in under-serviced areas… The party intends to increase the number of long-term care beds, with 15,000 new beds over the next five years… $1.9 billion over the next 10 years on mental health and addiction support… to reduce hospital overcrowding and improve wait times for care… [and] to increase autism funding to $100 million in the 2018-2019 fiscal year.

  • The coming, chaotic battle for the soul of a Doug Ford government

    He wants to cut taxes on corporate and personal income and fuel. He wants to increase spending on health care and infrastructure and (so far as one can tell) by further using provincial funds to relieve energy ratepayers. He intends to do all this and much more while steering the budget back to balance, without cutting a single public-sector job. In other words, he has conveyed no priorities at all, because he has displayed no willingness to choose between incompatible things.

  • The Next Four Years: An Ontario election post-mortem

    … Premier-designate Doug Ford… swept into power on a thin platform that was never fully costed. Economists estimate at least a $10 billion fiscal hole in the party’s promises. That means there will either be deep and painful cuts, a lot of unfulfilled promises, or both. Progressives who hoped Ontario was on the brink of a major expansion of social programs—universal dental care, pharmacare, child care, affordable housing—will now be tasked with turning that hope into resolve.

  • Imagining the best-case scenario for the Ford years

    The worst of the lot won. Doug Ford is premier-to-be. We said he is unfit for the job, and that remains true. From his bullying personality to his lying to his simplistic mind to his ignorance of government, Mr. Ford has all the makings of a poor political leader for the province… And yet… maybe it would not be too self-indulgent to allow ourselves a wishful glance ahead at the next four years in search of a prospect that isn’t all gloom.

  • MMIWG inquiry gets six-month deadline extension to finish its work

    … the extension will ensure more people can share their experiences with the inquiry, while still “underscoring the urgency” of its final report… extra money will depend on staffing and other costs that the inquiry will identify… The due date for the inquiry’s final report — meant to probe the “systemic causes” of violence against Indigenous women and girls and make recommendations to the government to address them — is now April 30, 2019.