• Immigrants make Canada the envy of the world

    Canada “is a country that does not ask about your origins; it only concerns itself with your destiny.” Those words were spoken by Peter Munk, founder and chairman of the Barrick Gold Corporation…
    The philanthropist who ensured that the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre offered the very best health care that Canadian patients and their families could hope for… was also an immigrant… Peter Munk’s story is one we hear time and again – immigrants who devote their lives to making Canada even better.

  • Canada’s multiculturalism is our identity

    On Oct. 8, 1971, … In addition to becoming an officially bilingual land, Canada would formally respect the diversity of its citizens’ languages, religions and cultures. The goal was integration; it was also about appeasing opposition to bilingualism. Mr. Trudeau faced no opposition in the House… quietly over the next decades, official multiculturalism lost its hokey qualities, as well as its capital letter, and evolved into an ingrained collective value.

  • Canada in 2018 is a country of global citizens

    Who would have guessed that 150 years after Confederation, Canada would become one of the most peaceably diverse societies on earth? Like other countries, we have many challenges to address and far to go to live up to the values we claim – but Canada has come a long way: from a colony of deferential subjects to a country of global citizens.

  • For Indigenous People, Homelessness Is More Than Lacking a Home

    Historic Displacement Homelessness… Contemporary Geographic Separation Homelessness… Spiritual Disconnection Homelessness… Mental Disruption and Imbalance Homelessness… Cultural Disintegration and Loss Homelessness… Overcrowding Homelessness… Relocation and Mobility Homelessness… Going Home Homelessness… Nowhere to Go Homelessness… Escaping or Evading Harm Homelessness… Emergency Crisis Homelessness… Climatic Refugee Homelessness

  • Why I will celebrate Canada Day

    We have long been a work in progress… Our highest court of appeal rested in Britain until 1949. Our Constitution was not patriated until 1982… By modern standards, Canada has not always acted in an enlightened fashion… Far too often its treatment of Indigenous peoples has been shameful. But not always. In recent decades, the courts in particular have been mindful of Indigenous rights. This is all part of our history. We have to recognize it and deal with it.

  • Celebrate the tepee protest. Demonstration improves social justice

    In fact, there’s nothing more Canadian than impolite party-crashing. Protest is in this country’s DNA, from the 19th-century pro-democracy rebellions in Upper and Lower Canada to the road blockades of Clayoquot Sound to the youth-fueled energy of Black Lives Matter and Idle No More… in Canada protesters – both individuals and those who come together in large groups – have led the way and improved social justice for us all.

  • The Jane Addams Model

    She sought to change the world by planting herself deeply in a particular neighborhood. She treated each person as a unique soul… There are many philanthropists and caregivers today who dislike theory and just want to get practical. It is this sort of doer’s arrogance and intellectual laziness that explains why so many charities do no good or do positive harm.

  • Time to recognize Indigenous people as one of Canada’s founders

    As we celebrate the 150th year of Confederation surely it is time to recognize that Aboriginal Peoples are intrinsic to what we are as a country. It would be a symbolic gesture but it would go a long way to recognizing and embracing the idea that First Nations have always been much more than refugees in their own country.

  • Learning black history makes Canadians better

    With black Canadians at just three per cent of the population, we’ve heard the argument that Black History Month is less relevant than commemorating the larger Indigenous or South Asian community’s respective histories. But Black History Month doesn’t come at the expense of others. In fact, learning about the black Canadian experience builds empathy; it doesn’t divide it.

  • Why Canada has avoided an anti-trade, anti-immigration backlash

    If declining incomes fuel anti-globalization… then what sets Canada apart is its recent income gains… More than 70 per cent of men aged 55 to 64 had full-time jobs in 1976; 20 years later, that ratio had fallen to less than 50 per cent. The only bright spot was provided by women. Even though their incomes were (and are) still less than men’s, they did see some income growth… enough to offset men’s losses