• Don’t let social housing crumble

    … allowing the corporation’s units to keep deteriorating and be shut down would lead to higher health-care spending, rising crime and a host of other social costs… investing in repairs would create thousands of jobs, spur private investment, and generate billions of extra dollars in federal and provincial taxes. For both social and economic reasons, the provincial and federal governments must commit money for much-needed repairs before this crisis deepens.

  • Ontario Parents want help for their developmentally delayed adult-age children

    Lengthy waiting lists remain for as many as 14,000 families whose children turn 18 and have to reapply for aid as they are cut off from funding they have enjoyed for years… the Liberals have doubled the budget for people with developmental disabilities since taking office in 2003. It now stands at $2.1 billion and last month’s provincial budget would increase that by $677 million

  • Urgent action needed to halt shut-down of social-housing units

    TCHC recently announced that it will be closing about 400 units next year because it doesn’t have enough money to repair them. That’s on top of 600 units already slated to be shut down this year…. the TCHC has a decade-long, $2.6-billion repair plan. But… TCHC says it can only access about $82 million [next year]. So once again the city is looking to the province and to Ottawa to do their part.

  • $5B housing pledge aims to help most vulnerable National Housing

    … the focus would be on supporting the most vulnerable Canadians, which in addition to people struggling with mental health, addictions and domestic abuse also includes seniors, persons with disabilities and veterans… The national strategy… will also include $3 billion dedicated towards strengthening the relationship between provinces and territories, targeted funding for northern communities and Indigenous communities… and increased funding to prevent and reduce homelessness.

  • Canadian foundation donates $12-million to support Indigenous people

    The Slaight Family Foundation has committed to providing that money over the next five years to 15 non-profit organizations that are engaged with the First Nations, Inuit and Métis on a wide range of initiatives, from health and education to cultural activities and preventing violence against Indigenous women.

  • John Tory’s Valentine’s budget lacks heart

    Mayor and Council could ask the average homeowner to pay an additional $8 a month in property tax in 2017, allowing the city to fund child care subsidies for up to 1,000 more children, rent supplements for 2,000 more families, and affordable rental housing for 500 additional families — all big steps toward addressing the unacceptably long wait-lists for these supports… Or… reintroduce a $60 vehicle registration tax — at a far lower cost to drivers — which could fund a reduction in TTC fares

  • Find emergency shelters for the homeless

    The city has known there is a shortage of shelters for the homeless for years. A 2013 survey found there were 5,000 homeless people in the city, but currently there are only 4,300 beds. And Toronto’s wait list for subsidized housing stands at a stunning 172,087, forcing some people onto the streets… the city’s shelters for women, youth and families [were] all filled past their capacity last Thursday… Shelters for families were completely full.

  • Charities of the Year 2016: Our annual report card on the good-deed doers worthy of your donations

    More than one-quarter of Canada’s 86,000 charities mention children or youth in their names or descriptions… The annual report card assesses how efficiently charities are raising and spending money, and evaluates how transparent they are about their finances and the work they do. This year, we scrutinized the 740 children’s charities that raked in total donations of more than $100,000 in 2013, the most recent year with a full set of tax return data available. The charities all focus on helping children who are in need in some way, whether it be illness, poverty or belonging to a marginalized group

  • Piling fines on the homeless makes no sense

    The law was changed three years ago by the former Conservative government so that fines would be mandatory, rather than at the judge’s discretion. But in this case, Ontario Court Justice David Paciocco refused to play along. As Paciocco sensibly said, “The marginalization and pointless harassment of the impoverished disabled with mandatory surcharge levies is a cost that is too heavy to bear in order to remedy distrust of judicial discretion.” … Homelessness is a social issue, not a legal one. No fine or ticket can end crimes resulting from homelessness, addictions and mental illness.

  • Ontario minimum wage goes up by 15 cents: shopping spree?

    $1.20 more a day or $6 more a week. The hike represents the second year of the Ontario government’s commitment to annually adjust the minimum wage to inflation… In comparison, the Alberta government is raising its minimum wage by $1 an hour on October 1, which will bring it up to $12.20, and it has committed to raise its minimum wage to $15 an hour by October 1, 2018.