• Canada’s charitable sector is more diverse than (some) rating agencies think

    While rigorous accreditation processes… and charity rating agencies… are not exactly the same, the sentiment is similar – people looking for some form of assessment about the impact of organizations. The challenge is that some of the criteria and metrics used by charity rating agencies in Canada are not effective, and are in fact misleading.

  • Common misconceptions about homelessness

    First, we should move away from a standard housing policy toward a person-centered approach that responds to individuals’ needs. We should recognize that people who are homeless often have networks; someone may not have a home but may still have a home neighbourhood… Second, we need to integrate harm reduction approaches into housing policies…

  • Look twice before judging an Indigenous person

    The paradigm we occupy, our reality, is merely the confluence of multiple stories. One of those stories is the lazy, dirty, drunken Indian story… The story doesn’t just impact non-aboriginal people. It is heard and understood by aboriginal peoples as well. It affects how we see the world… Anyone who claims not to be racist – who doesn’t check their stories with every encounter – fails themselves as well as others.

  • Forget ‘cultural appropriation’ — it’s about censorship

    What about the indigenous groups, and indeed, whites, who denounced Sen. Lynn Beyak as a racist… for pointing out that residential schools, for all the evil they did, did some good as well, a view shared by some indigenous people? That isn’t about cultural appropriation… It’s about silencing people — and points of view — by leveling false allegations of racism against them and intimidating others who share their views.

  • Time to turn inclusive innovation rhetoric into reality

    … given that economies are no better than the societies in which they are embedded, it is critical that business leaders turn their attention to them. We desperately need to maximize both growth and equality in society – the consequences of not doing so are dire. DSIPs offer a venue of constructive private-public experimentation.

  • Take the politics out of charity? Far better to just cancel the tax break

    If I give to my preferred charity with my own money, that is entirely my affair. But if I claim a tax credit on it, I am effectively forcing you and everyone else to pay for it as well… There is nothing voluntary in my conscription of your assistance. Neither is there much of the charitable spirit in demanding to be recompensed for what ought to be given freely.

  • It’s past time to protect the ‘precariat’

    Two new studies paint bleak portraits of the economic circumstances of young workers and others struggling to get by in the new economy. Together, they suggest that while governments may not want or be able to stop the evolution now underway, they must move quickly to address widening gaps in worker protections, lest the better part of a generation fall through the cracks… governments can’t and shouldn’t want to stop innovation. But neither are they powerless to shape it or to protect workers from its worst consequences.

  • Strike at the Canadian Hearing Society is about culture, not costs

    People who are culturally deaf believe the role of the CHS should be to facilitate their ability to live barrier-free in a world where audism and ableism are rampant – for example, by providing sign-language-interpretation services… the deaf and hard-of-hearing community is changing and the CHS has to adapt to meet its needs. In an aging world, hearing loss is more common, and more deaf and hard-of-hearing people are in mainstream schools and jobs, thanks to technology.

  • The Liberals’ First Nations agenda encounters reality

    This isn’t a “First Nations issue” except inasmuch as First Nations, as a population, are disadvantaged relative to other Canadians on social indicators that predict a vast catalogue of bad outcomes, from going to jail to homelessness to dying in a fire or getting murdered. Individual white Anglo-Saxon Canadians so disadvantaged run similar risks; individual aboriginal Canadians who are not so disadvantaged do not… truly transformational change on this front will only come with transformational change on the most basic fronts: education, employment, income. That’s a massive job.

  • Five ableist things I wish people would stop saying to me

    When people say “you seem normal,” it just sounds like they are afraid of neurodivergence and “crazy” people. It’s a veiled form of ableism… People want to see mental health and disability as an individual problem that individuals have and should solve on their own. Talking is often the first step, but what about steps two through 10? When we constantly redirect back to step one, it’s because we’re avoiding the responsibility that we have for helping people…