• Invictus Games are an opportunity to advocate for disability rights

    … Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, Carla Qualtrough has yet to produce the legislation she was tasked with… Even provincially, the government has failed to keep its promise of enforcing the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act… The Liberal government has even gone so far as to obstruct investigations by disability advocates. This does not seem like leadership “committed to building a more accessible Ontario

  • Make data on homeless deaths public

    The city should release not just the number of homeless deaths, as it recently did for the first time, but other information it now collects, too, such as on gender, unofficial cause of death, and location of death… we know very little about how these people ended up on the street or how they died. Were these opiate overdoses, suicides, deaths by exposure? And therefore what are the policy responses we should be demanding of governments?

  • Author of teen autism memoir grows up but can’t escape heartbreak

    … my parents were never in a state of denial about my autism, nor did they ever consign me to a “special needs” pigeonhole. They just strove to help me get better at doing the things I was good at… It seems to be not widely enough recognized that there are positives to be found in the neurologies of people with autism. If the world at large would take a deeper interest in how our brains work and research our uniquenesses — as opposed to focusing on our treatment and cure — we could take pride in our neuro-atypical natures.

  • On Canada Day let us remind ourselves we have done well, even as we strive to do better

    Rather than endless existential agonizing over “who are we,” civic nationalism asks simply: what do we want to do together? What are the purposes we want to achieve, what are the ideals we want to stand for? … An element of self-criticism, such as we are now going through, is therefore very much in order. So is a sense of proportion. Like any society, Canada has many sins to its name; foremost among them is the historic treatment and present condition of aboriginal Canadians, which is rightly the source of so much shame at present. But it is not the whole of the Canadian story.

  • A gift to Canada: Lifting people out of poverty benefits us all

    Pervasive poverty has a negative impact on us all – it affects children, their nutrition, and their ability to learn and grow; it makes our communities less inclusive; it drives up costs for health care and infrastructure; and it limits our country’s economic growth and competitiveness… We also believe in the critical importance of public policy as a driver of social change… strategy must address four key themes – prosperity, opportunity, inclusion and reconciliation.

  • Canada’s charitable sector is more diverse than (some) rating agencies think

    While rigorous accreditation processes… and charity rating agencies… are not exactly the same, the sentiment is similar – people looking for some form of assessment about the impact of organizations. The challenge is that some of the criteria and metrics used by charity rating agencies in Canada are not effective, and are in fact misleading.

  • Common misconceptions about homelessness

    First, we should move away from a standard housing policy toward a person-centered approach that responds to individuals’ needs. We should recognize that people who are homeless often have networks; someone may not have a home but may still have a home neighbourhood… Second, we need to integrate harm reduction approaches into housing policies…

  • Look twice before judging an Indigenous person

    The paradigm we occupy, our reality, is merely the confluence of multiple stories. One of those stories is the lazy, dirty, drunken Indian story… The story doesn’t just impact non-aboriginal people. It is heard and understood by aboriginal peoples as well. It affects how we see the world… Anyone who claims not to be racist – who doesn’t check their stories with every encounter – fails themselves as well as others.

  • Forget ‘cultural appropriation’ — it’s about censorship

    What about the indigenous groups, and indeed, whites, who denounced Sen. Lynn Beyak as a racist… for pointing out that residential schools, for all the evil they did, did some good as well, a view shared by some indigenous people? That isn’t about cultural appropriation… It’s about silencing people — and points of view — by leveling false allegations of racism against them and intimidating others who share their views.

  • Time to turn inclusive innovation rhetoric into reality

    … given that economies are no better than the societies in which they are embedded, it is critical that business leaders turn their attention to them. We desperately need to maximize both growth and equality in society – the consequences of not doing so are dire. DSIPs offer a venue of constructive private-public experimentation.