• Who’s playing identity politics? Everyone

    Diversity is not our strength. Unity is our strength. What makes Canada strong is our ability to unite people of diverse backgrounds with a shared set of goals and values. That is what we’re good at… there’s plenty of evidence that our highly selective immigration system – which shows no sign of changing – is quite good at identifying people who will integrate and do well. The real test of any immigration policy is: How will the kids do? And so far as I can see, most of the the kids are doing fine.

  • An Apology for Multiculturalism

    Not long ago we assumed globalization, with its intensity of interactions, would breed tolerance for others. Instead, we must fight for that ideal, even if flawed, now more than ever… We should fight for multiculturalism not because it’s easy but because it’s hard. Open societies are rare; they call to each other over the great nightmare of history, candles in windy darknesses. And yet openness to the other has always been an essential element of basic human decency.

  • Have Mayor Tory and Council Delivered on Poverty Reduction?

    In sum, thousands more residents do have access to jobs, housing, transit, child care, recreation programs and others services as a result of council decisions over the past four years. However, these modest service expansions have hardly put a dent in long waiting lists, or in Toronto’s high levels of poverty levels and inequality.

  • Canada Can Benefit Economically from the Asylum Seeker Surge

    Canada’s support for refugee seekers can be more than just a humanitarian stand. It can lead to an economic benefit to host provinces. How? According to Statistics Canada, job vacancies (unadjusted for seasonality) increased by 19.3 percent from the first quarter of 2017 to more than 462,000 in the first quarter of 2018… Remarkably, a sizable share of these available jobs did not require previous work experience or a minimum education level.

  • As gun violence spikes, Toronto faces a reckoning on the root causes of tragedy

    “The feeling of disadvantage and unfairness leads the poor to seek compensation and satisfaction by all means, including committing crimes… These kids feel a sense of social isolation. They don’t feel part of anything,” … There’s growing consensus that gun and gang violence is not a problem the city can arrest its way out of.

  • A word to the wise: Why wisdom might be ripe for rediscovery

    … modern scholarly definitions mention certain traits: compassion and prosocial attitudes that reflect concern for the common good; pragmatic knowledge of life; the use of one’s pragmatic knowledge to resolve personal and social problems; an ability to cope with ambiguity and uncertainty and to see multiple points of view; emotional stability and mastery of one’s feelings; a capacity for reflection and for dispassionate self-understanding.

  • Ontario’s cities need a new approach to homelessness

    The system seems to simply move from crisis to crisis with minimal evidence of strategic or long-term thinking… Under this model, Ontario government would issue a call for proposals to its municipal partners and flow new funding based on bids by municipal governments to achieve real measurable outcomes… fewer people in core-housing need, fewer people on the waiting lists for social housing, and a reduction and ultimate elimination of homelessness.

  • Charities must innovate to attract a new generation of donors

    Canadians annually give more than $14-billion to charities and non-profit organizations. But our strong culture of giving, so essential to our quality of life, is increasingly at risk… Donations are dropping across all age categories and donors aged 50 and over account for 74 per cent of donations… the annual average donation by new citizens is $672, compared to $509 for native-born Canadians… Over the past 30 years, women have steadily gained ground as a percentage of donors. The only factor holding women back is income disparity.

  • My activism is better than yours

    If one wants to roll into police services meetings, or use one’s writing skills to critique the systems that have been built largely to reinforce oppression, then that is your right. For those of us who are using our professional networks to try to move the needle to a better world in our respective corners that, too, is our right. We should not begrudge the others’ approach. No one has the right to tell Justice McLeod or any another Black person how they should go about their community work.

  • Why this unbeliever is happy to celebrate Christmas

    The truth is that our society has been given its moral principles by Christianity, and those principles shape us, whether we are committed to a religion or not. Christian feelings enter in the moral air we breathe and find a comfortable home within us. We believe we should see the welfare of others as at least as important as our own. We should treat everyone fairly… If we go out of our way to smooth the path of minorities, we are reflecting the same feelings.