• Immigrants make Canada the envy of the world

    Canada “is a country that does not ask about your origins; it only concerns itself with your destiny.” Those words were spoken by Peter Munk, founder and chairman of the Barrick Gold Corporation…
    The philanthropist who ensured that the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre offered the very best health care that Canadian patients and their families could hope for… was also an immigrant… Peter Munk’s story is one we hear time and again – immigrants who devote their lives to making Canada even better.

  • A word to the wise: Why wisdom might be ripe for rediscovery

    … modern scholarly definitions mention certain traits: compassion and prosocial attitudes that reflect concern for the common good; pragmatic knowledge of life; the use of one’s pragmatic knowledge to resolve personal and social problems; an ability to cope with ambiguity and uncertainty and to see multiple points of view; emotional stability and mastery of one’s feelings; a capacity for reflection and for dispassionate self-understanding.

  • Canada’s multiculturalism is our identity

    On Oct. 8, 1971, … In addition to becoming an officially bilingual land, Canada would formally respect the diversity of its citizens’ languages, religions and cultures. The goal was integration; it was also about appeasing opposition to bilingualism. Mr. Trudeau faced no opposition in the House… quietly over the next decades, official multiculturalism lost its hokey qualities, as well as its capital letter, and evolved into an ingrained collective value.

  • Ontario’s cities need a new approach to homelessness

    The system seems to simply move from crisis to crisis with minimal evidence of strategic or long-term thinking… Under this model, Ontario government would issue a call for proposals to its municipal partners and flow new funding based on bids by municipal governments to achieve real measurable outcomes… fewer people in core-housing need, fewer people on the waiting lists for social housing, and a reduction and ultimate elimination of homelessness.

  • An affordable place to call home

    Field of Dreams, located in Elmira, Ont., gives people with intellectual disabilities the opportunity to live independently in their own homes. That’s far better than the institutions they were once shut away in and the group homes with full-time oversight that have largely replaced those institutions. Their independent living is assisted by tenants in the same small apartment complexes who take on the role of “good neighbours.” They’re on hand to provide a little help when needed in exchange for more affordable rent.

  • Canada in 2018 is a country of global citizens

    Who would have guessed that 150 years after Confederation, Canada would become one of the most peaceably diverse societies on earth? Like other countries, we have many challenges to address and far to go to live up to the values we claim – but Canada has come a long way: from a colony of deferential subjects to a country of global citizens.

  • It’s past time to improve our charity laws

    Government policy‑making is heavily influenced by for‑profit corporate interests. Companies are free to do anything, as long as their political activities are aimed at increasing profit, and they get to deduct their political advertising and lobbying expenses from their taxable income. Charities, on the other hand, are restricted to using less than 10 per cent of their resources on political activities. This constrains the ability of charities to advocate publicly for policy and legal reform that benefit the public interest.

  • Charities must innovate to attract a new generation of donors

    Canadians annually give more than $14-billion to charities and non-profit organizations. But our strong culture of giving, so essential to our quality of life, is increasingly at risk… Donations are dropping across all age categories and donors aged 50 and over account for 74 per cent of donations… the annual average donation by new citizens is $672, compared to $509 for native-born Canadians… Over the past 30 years, women have steadily gained ground as a percentage of donors. The only factor holding women back is income disparity.

  • When Collective Impact has an Impact – An Evaluation of the Practice

    Collective Impact is a long-term proposition: take the time to lay a strong foundation; System changes take many forms: be iterative an intentional; Equity is achieved through different routes; be aware and adaptable; Collective Impact initiatives take on different roles in driving change; be open to different routes to make a difference

  • Ottawa pits ‘traditional knowledge’ against ‘science’, and then walks away

    Ottawa’s recently introduced legislation to amend the federal environmental impact assessment process so that it “takes into account scientific information, traditional knowledge of the Indigenous peoples of Canada, and community knowledge.” … Asking for the term “traditional knowledge of the Indigenous peoples of Canada” to be defined, and for ways to evaluate it, is a good idea. Doing so doesn’t devalue traditional knowledge; in fact, a strong definition will only serve to give it more value.