• England trials free talk therapy

    England is in the midst of a unique national experiment, the world’s most ambitious effort to treat depression, anxiety and other common mental illnesses. The rapidly growing initiative… offers virtually open-ended talk therapy free of charge at clinics throughout the country: in remote farming villages, industrial suburbs, isolated immigrant communities and high-end enclaves. The goal is to eventually create a system of primary care for mental health

  • Toronto’s plan for tackling opioid crisis falls short

    One of the obvious recommendations, then, from Thursday’s meeting was to speed up the opening of the three supervised injection sites… A better idea comes from harm reduction workers at the sites who argue that while the centres are being renovated for supervised injection services, temporary or mobile sites should be opened now. Pop-up clinics like that would be in line with how the city responds to a flu outbreak.

  • Ottawa’s new tax measures unfairly target many doctors

    The reason physicians (and other small business owners) retain money in a corporation is because they don’t have pensions or benefits like many salaried employees… Governments can, of course, change policy. But if they adopt measures that make incorporation unattractive and impossible to accumulate retirement savings, then they need to provide an alternative, such as salaries and pensions. That would mean a fundamental revamp of how physicians are remunerated.

  • A sea change in the war on smoking

    Prohibition doesn’t work – whether we’re talking opioids or tobacco. Harm reduction, though it often makes us uncomfortable, does work. Smoking low-nicotine cigarettes is better than smoking high-nicotine ones, and vaping is better than smoking. Those are the kind of plain language messages that regulators and public-health officials need to deliver in Canada, not just the U.S.

  • What Canadians Can Learn from America’s Healthcare Debacle

    Healthcare becomes the embodiment of a nation. We speak with pride of our commitment to a social system that relies and insists upon the idea that I will look after you when you are old, and that the next generation will look after me when I am old. It is… a part of who we are as Canadians. Our healthcare, with all its imperfections, has become an integral part of our identities.

  • Canada should listen to wake-up call on health care

    … according to the data, access to health care could be greatly improved if we had more doctors. Among the 11 advanced countries, Canada has the fewest doctors per 1,000 residents. In 2014, we had 2.5 doctors for every thousand people. Norway had 4.4 and the U.S. was only slightly better than Canada, with 2.6… the government has successfully controlled spending on doctors’ services, but it comes at a cost.

  • Dental care is a right – not a luxury

    … dental problems can develop into gum disease, serious infection and oral cancers. Some dentists… recognize the serious nature of these issues, but go on to attribute them solely to the individual and their poor choices… Despite being recognized as a key component of health care, dental care is still administered as if it is an unnecessary cosmetic procedure; privately funded and excluded from medicare. This is not the case in other countries

  • PET brain scans show many Alzheimer’s patients may not actually have the disease

    A significant portion of people with mild cognitive impairment or dementia who are taking medication for Alzheimer’s may not actually have the disease… The findings could change the way doctors treat people in these hard-to-diagnose groups and save money currently being spent on inappropriate medication… “we’re getting a 66 per cent change… of people who are on a drug and didn’t need to be on those drugs.”

  • Canada committed to improving mental health in Indigenous communities

    Preventing suicide requires achieving social equity. We have already taken important steps by investing in key social determinants of health, such as housing, education and the environment. While these are first steps, our intent is to continue investing in all areas in pursuit of social equity… Promoting life and preventing suicide requires respect for Indigenous knowledge and practices…

  • Poor health-care ranking a sign our system needs fixing

    What may surprise many is that Canada ranks so poorly (nine of 11) in what are arguably the two most critical areas, health outcomes and equity… The problem is that Canada does not cover a broad enough range of services. Medicare covers 100 per cent of hospital and physician services, but too often fails to cover essential prescription drugs, home care, long-term care and dental care, which is the norm in most wealthy countries.