• ‘No Jab, No Pay’. In Australia, no excuse accepted for unvaccinated kids

    The financial penalty for non-vaccination is imposed principally on the poor – those who receive income-tested benefits – while it is wealthier parents who are most likely to eschew vaccination… But the majority of parents of unvaccinated and under-vaccinated kids are not dogmatic; they are overwhelmed, usually by monetary and logistical issues. What they need are not financial penalties, but practical help – carrots, not sticks.

  • Doug Ford needs to rein in Ontario’s bureaucratic health-care mess

    … the Liberals carried out 15 significant restructuring exercises, centralizing and decentralizing and creating new layers of regional administration such as LHINs (local health integration networks) and CCACs (community care access centres), before settling on the current bloated structure of 14 LHINs (each of which has a CEO and six vice-presidents) and 78 sub-LHINs. (The CCACs were rolled into the LHINs after a damning Auditor-General’s report showing they spent almost 40 per cent of home-care dollars on administration.)

  • Ontario Tories’ point man on health care wants more innovation

    the Progressive Conservative vision places an emphasis on: making more health care available outside of hospitals; improving integration as patients move from hospital to home and throughout the rest of the health system; increasing innovation and making better use of technology; and improving access to patient records… What distinguishes the Progressive Conservatives from other parties, Devlin said, is that they have the “political will to modernize our system by creating real integrated care.”

  • A Prescription for Better Health for Canadians

    If you exercise, eat well, get good sleep and manage your stress, you are going to be healthier than if you didn’t do those things. The point is that across the population some people are much more likely, and able, to make those healthier choices than others are. There’s a need for public policy that doesn’t just tell people to make better choices, but that helps create the conditions and provide the resources that enable individuals to make those healthy choices.

  • Overview of the Progressive Conservative Party’s Healthcare Platform

    The party intends to spend $98 million annually to provide dental care to low-income seniors… in under-serviced areas… The party intends to increase the number of long-term care beds, with 15,000 new beds over the next five years… $1.9 billion over the next 10 years on mental health and addiction support… to reduce hospital overcrowding and improve wait times for care… [and] to increase autism funding to $100 million in the 2018-2019 fiscal year.

  • Fixing Ontario’s health system will take more than campaign rhetoric

    … hallway medicine… It seems to sum up so much that’s wrong with our health care system… this is not a new problem… And it won’t simply be swept away by electing a new one… The hospital, no matter how many beds there are, will always be the place people go when they have no other options. But that’s not good patient care and it’s not an option taxpayers can afford, especially with a growing and aging population.

  • Should universities inform parents when their children have mental-health issues?

    College and university students are adults. They have a right to privacy. Parents are not entitled to see their children’s medical records any more than they are entitled to see their transcripts… When students exhibit concerning behaviour – such as they stop going to class, stop bathing, withdraw socially, engage in self-harm, start talking about suicide and so forth – alarm bells should go off, ideally triggered by professors, dormitory assistants and counsellors. And parents feel they have a right to know.

  • A Prescription for Better Health for Canadians

    … helping families raising children, would have a much bigger impact on the average Canadian’s health than spending more on the health-care system would… The worse a person’s childhood is, the more risk there is of everything from obesity and diabetes to substance abuse and suicide. If we really want to get upstream and prevent illness, it means doing more to support people who are raising children. It would take pressure off the health-care system and save money, but only in the long term.

  • Mental Health Care (or Lack Thereof) in Canada

    In 2015/16, six percent of payments to family physicians were for psychotherapy and counselling services. Despite this, many of them report being uncomfortable providing counselling themselves, for reasons ranging from a perception that they are inadequately trained for such work, to time constraints. Family physicians also report a number of barriers to referring patients to psychologists, the largest being cost, since non-physician counselling services are not covered by public health insurance.

  • Filling the Cavities in Canada’s Dental Coverage

    A straightforward way of creating universality would be to gradually expand and merge existing public plans until everyone in the population was covered. However, universality does not necessarily mean that everyone must be insured through the same plan. As an alternative, we explore a mixed model with competition between private and public insurance in our recent C.D. Howe Institute report.