• Good Intentions, Not Enough Action in Indigenous Child Welfare Plan, Says Advocate

    … many of the prevention programs the government is now pledging to fund don’t currently exist. Additional funding will be needed for capital and start-up costs for new programming to keep kids with their families… “It’s taken us literally generations to get into the circumstances that have led to a severe overrepresentation of Indigenous children in child welfare… So it’s not going to happen overnight, but we’re seeing really positive movement…”

  • Ottawa must learn from failures on Indigenous programs

    On education, he found a significant gap in high school graduation rates between Indigenous students living on reserves and other Canadian students… On employment, Ferguson found that Employment and Social Development Canada did not collect the data it needed to assess whether programs aimed at helping Indigenous people find work were actually increasing the number of people finding sustainable jobs.

  • Federal judge approves $875 million settlement for Indigenous ’60s scoop survivors

    The settlement includes $750 million for the survivors, $50 million for an Indigenous healing foundation and $75 million for legal fees. Last October, the federal government said the proposed settlement was for about 20,000 survivors who were moved between 1951 and 1991… [Justice Michel] Shore noted during his opening remarks that the hearing was not the place to share stories, but rather an opportunity for victims to weigh in on the proposed settlement.

  • Black and Indigenous children over-represented in Ontario child-welfare system: report

    The review by the province’s human rights commission finds a “staggering” number of Indigenous children in care across Canada — more now than there were in residential schools at the height of their use — and Ontario is part of the dismal situation. “The proportion of Indigenous children admitted into care (in Ontario) was 2.6 times higher than their proportion in the child population,” the report states. “The proportion of black children admitted into care was 2.2 times higher than their proportion in the child population.”

  • Want to know if the budget will help close the gender gap? Good luck

    In its 2016 fall economic statement, the government announced that to ensure — not help ensure, but ensure — the delivery of “real and meaningful change for all Canadians,” it would subject future budgets to more rigorous scrutiny “by completing and publishing a gender-based analysis of budgetary measures.” … It’s when we come to the analysis of the commitment that we run into trouble.

  • The law has done its job, but there must be justice for Tina Fontaine

    Outrage at her death in 2014 was a crucial factor in prompting the Trudeau government to set up the inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) two years later… its success will be measured… in how effective it is in sparking real change. The inquiry… has compiled 1,200 recommendations to address the problems it is looking at. The issue isn’t more recommendations — it’s whether they are put into action.

  • With Philpott at the helm, Ottawa (finally) takes action on Indigenous issues

    One of Dr. Philpott’s most welcome actions is to finally get Ottawa to comply with a Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruling related to Jordan’s Principle… Health Canada has approved more than 29,000 requests in recent months, most for children with disabilities and mental-health issues… the boldest shift of all has been in funding… First Nations with good financial records will now get guaranteed 10-year funding, fully indexed, and with little paperwork. Rather than be wards of the state, we will see the emergence of more autonomous First Nations.

  • Ottawa pushes venture capitalists to fix startup gender gap as condition of $400-million funding

    Ottawa is pushing venture capitalists to help fix the gender gap in the Canadian startup scene, telling those who want to qualify for a $400-million funding program they must “demonstrate how their strategies would advance these objectives.” … “We are sending an important signal we believe that … diversity is important and that in itself can lead to better returns,”Ottawa pushes venture capitalists to fix startup gender gap as condition of $400-million funding

  • What to do about the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in prisons

    Between 2007 and 2016, while the overall federal prison population increased by less than 5 per cent, the number of Indigenous prisoners rose by 39 per cent… In fact, for the last three decades, there has been an increase every single year in the federal incarceration rates for Indigenous people. While they make up less than 5 per cent of the Canadian population, today they represent 26.4 per cent of all federal inmates.

  • New book ‘Invisible No More’ will change what you think you know about police brutality

    For white women, the concern is about police nonresponse to violence. For women of colour, police response is the problem – too many cases where officers responding to domestic violence calls sexually assault the person who called for help, strip searches and cavity searches, criminalization around supposed welfare fraud, the way child protective services police motherhood of women of colour, and how prostitution is policed. “Very few people have paid attention to the police interactions… Counting police violence in the overall equation of violence…”