• Why are some gender activists denying science?

    … the science is settled. The two biological sexes (and there are only two) are broadly (though by no means perfectly) coterminous with gender… Close to 100 per cent of the human race is born with a set of either male or female chromosomes. A small number of people are born with chromosomal and/or reproductive abnormalities, and these people are commonly identified as “intersex.” … None of this is to argue that we should force people to conform to gender stereotypes, or punish them if they don’t.

  • Canada’s new sexual assault law is a ‘catastrophic attack’ on the rights of the accused

    They have channeled the mistaken but widespread belief that the justice system is skewed against women into Bill C-51, which has finished second reading in Parliament and will now receive attention from the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. C-51 proposes changes that will satisfy many radical feminists, but may ruin the lives of many innocent men accused of sexual assault.

  • Canada’s big cities are feeling the pressure of income inequality

    Rising inequality is not just pervasive in our cities; it is almost exclusive to our cities. Yet, municipalities cannot address this challenge on their own… middle class and middle income are not necessarily one and the same… The reality is that middle-income Canadians living in cities such as those are likely the ones feeling the effects of rising inequality the most.

  • Improving Canadians’ income mobility is the next big policy challenge

    We can’t know whether the expansion of digital infrastructure will improve income mobility in rural parts of Canada, or slow the migration of the young to urban hubs… All government can do is try to ensure that every Canadian is as well-educated and as connected as possible…

  • Feds say they can’t accept Senate changes to bill aiming to end Indian Act sexism

    … the government that came to power promising not just a better relationship with Canada’s Indigenous people but also a more gender-inclusive approach to governing will have to stick with some of the sexism in the act or face enormous new costs… eliminating all of the sex-based discrimination could increase the number of people who have Indian status by 80,000 to two million… Each is entitled to such things as tax breaks, supplementary health benefits and money for postsecondary education.

  • Never forget the lessons of Europe’s concentration camps

    It is time to remind ourselves why we developed such a passionate and, we thought, unshakeable commitment to democracy and human rights, to remember the three lessons we were supposed to have learned from the concentration camps of Europe: Indifference is injustice’s incubator; it’s not just what you stand for, it’s what you stand up for; and we can never forget how the world looks to those who are vulnerable.

  • Basic income would give women choices

    The women who would benefit most from basic income are the poorest and most marginalized among us, with and without children, often members of racialized groups. Some are unable to work in paid employment. Others work in part-time, precarious, poorly paid, often exploitive conditions… an adequate basic income will give the most marginalized women more choice: more choice about how to spend their valuable time, more choice about leaving exploitive labour conditions, more choice about leaving abusive relationships.

  • Canadian Human Rights Commission says children left behind on basic rights

    The report looked at issues such as child welfare services on First Nations reserves, the rights of transgender children, children with disabilities and migrant children locked up in detention centres alongside their parents as the system processes their cases… 60 per cent related to disability. Almost half the disability complaints dealt with mental health issues.

  • Amnesty International honours Canada’s Indigenous-rights movement

    Amnesty International describes the Ambassador of Conscience Award as its highest honour, given annually to those who show courage in standing up to injustice. In announcing the award, Amnesty underlined the fact that although they live in a prosperous country, Canada’s Indigenous peoples are “consistently among the most marginalized members of society.”

  • Ontario urged to tackle gender pay gap with transparency law

    The changes proposed by the Toronto-based Equal Pay Coalition would require employers to report and post hourly wage and pay arrangements, including the breakdown of part-time, contract and temporary agency employees as women increasingly bear the brunt of precarious work… The gap sharpens considerably based on race and origin. The pay gap for indigenous women is 57 per cent, for immigrant women it is 39 per cent, and for racialized women it is 32 per cent.