• Let’s not dismiss the painful pattern of microaggressions

    … Examples of microaggressions included: general condescension; intuiting that others expected their work to be inferior; or being treated as an intimidating presence… Some people who aren’t subject to microaggressions view them as small, unimportant experiences that are blown out of proportion. But BEP participants told us their effects are real and cumulative… anti-black racism is an especially stubborn force.

  • Census: Median income in four of five Indigenous communities below poverty line

    Statistics Canada reported a spike in income levels in 2015… Only 26 of the 503 of reserves with income data had higher median household incomes… research has shown that Indigenous Peoples regularly earn less than the median income. A 2014 study found they were almost as disadvantaged as in 2006 as they were 25 years earlier in 1981… income isn’t always tied to location, such as being in a remote community.

  • Historical redress for the Sixties Scoop

    … the $800-million agreement represents meagre compensation for the trauma suffered by aboriginal children who were ripped from their families… It is a worthwhile and significant gesture nonetheless, and a tangible attempt at rectifying a deep historical wrong… Minister Carolyn Bennett happens to agree that aboriginal child welfare, a shared jurisdiction, needs an overhaul… Money has been added in the system, and Ms. Bennett says she wants more of it to go to families and children.

  • Ottawa is right to settle with Sixties Scoop victims

    Not only was the past program shameful, so was the government’s continuing defence of it. Now Ottawa has taken two other steps that should help in the healing process… $50 million for a new Indigenous Healing Foundation to help the victims reclaim their identity… $75 million to pay the legal fees of the estimated 20,000 victims who are expected to receive $25,000 to $50,000 each… Now… it should set its sights on correcting other ongoing wrongs to Indigenous children.

  • Give First Nations children an equal chance

    First Nations children are uniquely affected by federal underfunding of services on-reserve… Your government has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on litigation to resist full implementation of the tribunal’s decisions – a move that is incompatible with your pledged support for a new partnership with First Nations, and all Indigenous people in Canada and their governments… We are asking you to implement the tribunal’s decisions immediately…

  • The Personal Philanthropy Project: Research… (Part 1)

    … many affluent Canadians do not plan or budget for their giving, and most do not have a sense of appropriate giving amounts. With that in mind, and armed with these research findings, there seems to be a tremendous opportunity to establish some type of guideline or informational framework rooted in a new social norm for giving, at least for this cohort of higher-earning Canadians.

  • Now is the time for Ottawa to create a path to progress with Indigenous people

    On this day in 2007, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which sets out minimum standards necessary “for the dignity, survival and well-being of Indigenous peoples,” was adopted by the UN General Assembly. Let this be the year that sees the leaders of all federal parties agree to work with each other and with Indigenous peoples to make the full and effective implementation of the declaration a priority.

  • Our incomes may have grown, but lower earners are still losing

    The census tells a tale of amazing prosperity for the already well-to-do, with individual incomes for those standing at the top one per cent growing by 48 per cent since 1985… One in seven, that’s also the fraction of Canadians living in what Statistics Canada carefully calls “low income.” … one in seven is exactly the fraction of low-income Canadians recorded in the 2005 census.

  • Rising incomes aren’t being shared as widely as they should

    In fact, the share of Canadians living in low-income households actually increased slightly to 14.2 per cent (that’s 4.8 million people) from 14 per cent in 2005. Seniors fared the worst, with 14.5 per cent living in poverty, up from 12 per cent in the previous decade. And while the percentage of children living in poverty was down slightly to 17.8 from 18.8 per cent, the picture is still alarming.

  • Get sexist language out of the Indian Act

    … the Liberal government is insisting on passing a law that fails to fully address sex discrimination in the Indian Act. It is defending a version of the bill that goes only part way and will be vulnerable to a court challenge as soon as it is passed… members of the newly feisty Senate… are insisting that Bill S-3, the law in question, be amended to remove all vestiges of sexist language that affects who qualifies to be legally regarded as a status Indian.