• Unfounded sexual assault cases: A human-rights issue

    The OHRC has made enforcing human rights in the criminal-justice system one of its key priorities for the next three to five years. We are also committed to promoting a human-rights culture through education – to address and eliminate, at the source, the kinds of stereotypes that may be behind some of these statistics. This is about our humanity and the true meaning of equal justice for all. Sexual-assault survivors must be taken seriously.

  • Hysteria from Conservatives over harmless motion on Islamophobia

    We live in a time both of much more widespread and open expressions of racism — thanks, internet — and of acute hypersensitivity to rude or even frank speech of all kinds. Each feeds off the other. But the alternative to “political correctness” is not bigotry and intolerance, and the answer to racism is not censorship. Indeed, we have too much of that already… The burden of proof is always on those who wish to restrict freedom to show why they must.

  • Sixties Scoop survivors win a just victory

    Like the residential schools, the “Sixties Scoop” was an attempt to forcibly assimilate indigenous children. The strategy was the same: dislocate them from their family, community and language – and watch the culture atrophy… “The issue is what was known in the 1960s about the existential importance to the First Nations peoples of protecting and preserving their distinctive cultures and traditions, including their concept of the extended family…”

  • Liberals revive funding for groups that take government to court

    The new program will offer a minimum of $1.5-million a year for the defence of minority-language rights. The remaining funding will go the defence of equality rights, democratic rights, freedom of religion, expression and association, and the right to life, liberty and security of the person… the new program will be administered by an independent body, with two panels of experts determining the funding that will go toward official-language rights and toward human rights.

  • Trudeau government must end foot-dragging on promises to indigenous people

    The department [of Indigenous and Northern Affairs] has the long-standing and unfortunate reputation of being incapable of creating improvements, either within its own ranks or for the indigenous people it is supposed to serve… “Until a problem-solving mindset is brought to these issues to develop solutions built around people instead of defaulting to litigation, arguments about money, and process roadblocks, this country will continue to squander the potential and lives of much of its Indigenous population,”

  • Ladies, check your privilege

    For all the barriers that women face, we have abundant freedoms and privileges that are not available to men… the myth that women only make 78 per cent of what men make is an alternative fact that does not stand up to reality. Besides, who does the dirty work? Not us… The vast majority of workplace fatalities are male. So are the vast majority of workers in policing, firefighting, war and other lethal professions… As for violence, men are the chief victims.

  • Quebec judge gives Ottawa more time to fix part of Indian Act declared discriminatory

    Recognizing that many sections of the Indian Act are discriminatory… the government said it would make changes in two phases. The first phase would focus on gender-based discrimination and the second phase would look at the rest of the act. Bill S-3… was introduced in the Senate rather than the House because… the government believed it could be expedited. But the Senate aboriginal peoples committee was not prepared to give it a rubber stamp… But all of the senators on the committee… agreed that the legislation was flawed.

  • The trouble with billionaires masquerading as populists

    … we’re told we live in a time of popular revolt against the “elites” and that Donald Trump just won the U.S. presidency because of his “populism.” … The real question is whether Trump and his crowd get to define and shape that anti-status quo sentiment… the two richest men in Canada — David Thomson and Galen Weston — now have as much wealth as the bottom 30 per cent of Canadians (11 million people).

  • Tackling inequality begins with cracking down on tax havens

    … the debate is not about whether extreme inequality is a problem but rather about how to solve it… one concrete proposal, endorsed by the authors of the Oxfam report, is likely politically saleable and has the potential to provide some the resources needed to tackle inequality: a global crack-down on tax havens and tax cheats… The costs to Canada of tax avoidance and evasion are estimated to be in the many tens of billions of dollars every year.

  • Women killed by their spouses are not casualties in someone else’s story

    “Humanizing the (usually) male predators and murderers of women while the achievements and life stories of their victims are ignored only contributes to the epidemic of violence against women.”