• An Open Letter To Canadian Women, From Kathleen Wynne

    … there are still too few women running for office across Canada, and I want to see more women in city halls and parliaments in every corner of this country. I want to tell you to run.
    Not because it will be easy. I have been called many names… I ask you to run because it is necessary. Because we need another slate of brave women willing to tackle stereotypes and the campaign trail in tandem.

  • Bank of Canada head says subsidized child care boosts workforce potential

    Helping more women, young people, Indigenous people, recent immigrants and Canadians living with disabilities enter the job market could help the labour force expand by half a million people, he said. By his estimate, that kind of workforce injection could raise the country’s output by $30 billion per year or 1.5 per cent… Poloz highlighted Quebec’s child-care program as one model to help women, who he noted represent the largest source of economic potential, enter the workforce.

  • Ontario is courting a home-care fiasco

    the new institution: Personal Support Services Ontario (PSSO) is going to recruit, train and employ personal-support workers and provide care to a select group of home-care clients. The agencies that provide home care were gobsmacked, and now they’ve taken legal action to prevent the government from following through on PSSO… a coalition of 11 not-for-profit and for-profit home-care providers who, between them, provide 95 per cent of home-care services in the province, allege that the move “will have dire consequences for patients and their families, for service providers and their employees and for the home care and health care systems at large.”

  • Want to know if the budget will help close the gender gap? Good luck

    In its 2016 fall economic statement, the government announced that to ensure — not help ensure, but ensure — the delivery of “real and meaningful change for all Canadians,” it would subject future budgets to more rigorous scrutiny “by completing and publishing a gender-based analysis of budgetary measures.” … It’s when we come to the analysis of the commitment that we run into trouble.

  • The double standard of driving while black – in Canada

    If you are a person of colour in Canada, you experience a profoundly different – and sometimes troubling – relationship with the law… Who you are doesn’t matter; it’s what you are. If you are black in Canada, you are subject to a different standard and, often, seemingly, different laws… We know that children are not born with prejudice. Racism is learned.

  • The law has done its job, but there must be justice for Tina Fontaine

    Outrage at her death in 2014 was a crucial factor in prompting the Trudeau government to set up the inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) two years later… its success will be measured… in how effective it is in sparking real change. The inquiry… has compiled 1,200 recommendations to address the problems it is looking at. The issue isn’t more recommendations — it’s whether they are put into action.

  • Guilt over Aboriginals can lead to teaching children untruths. It’s happening in Canada

    Much of what is said and done in the name of native reconciliation in Canada today amounts to a troubling misrepresentation of historical facts… History is no longer the collection of facts bequeathed to us by those who went before. Today it is whatever story satisfies current sensitivities, regardless of what actually happened.

  • The #metoo moment is important, but don’t forget the last one

    The #metoo moment… is a consciousness-raising fuelled in its reach and breadth by social media. It is a generation of women who feel they were sold a bill of goods when they were told they were equal. They are asking us: “How can this be true when our lives are curtailed by sexual violence?” … Let’s build on the moment of shock and dismay to create an adequately funded national strategy that uses this moment of holding politicians… and leave a changed future for the women and men who follow.

  • Imagining an alternative to growing global inequality

    If the global growth in income inequality keeps on at its current pace, populist and nationalist trends around the world will flourish… 82 per cent of the wealth generated last year went to the richest 1 per cent of the global population. The poorest half of the world’s population — 3.7 billion people — saw no increase at all… the wealth of the billionaire class has risen by an annual average of 13 per cent since 2010, over six times faster than the wages of average workers.

  • Let residential school survivors share their stories

    Angela Shisheesh… would like her harrowing story of abuse to be part of the historical record, accessible to the public like those of many of her fellow victims. Yet because she, like so many others, settled her legal case before 2006, it is up the organizations responsible for her maltreatment to determine whether her testimony can be made public… To deny her and other victims a voice amounts to a sort of cultural erasure, an important aspect of the residential schools’ terrible impact.