• Mental disabilities shouldn’t be accommodated with extra time on exams

    Provincial human rights commissions insist that these extra-time accommodations are necessary. These commissions are not neutral investigative bodies but advocacy agencies with expansive agendas and wide powers to interpret and apply human rights code provisions. On this subject, their directions are inconsistent with prevailing principles of human rights law.

  • The experiment that turned popular gender theory on its head

    Gender warriors, please don’t shoot the messenger. Take the Hjernevask challenge and watch the documentary. If, after watching it, you still think social construction and discrimination account for the gender gap at Google, well, my advice is to not take ocean cruises lest you fall off the side of the world.

  • Aboriginals deserve a fair deal, but enough with us hating ourselves

    Despite the fact that many hundreds of billions of public dollars have been spent with constructive intent in Canada in this field since the Second World War, and for decades Canadian courts have generally been very sympathetic to the petitions and legal demands of native groups and individuals, it is not discernible that their condition, quality of life, or socio-economic levels of achievement have progressed much. Everyone regrets this and very few people claim to have much idea of what to do about it.

  • How privileged are you? Take this test to find out

    … the real class divide is not the one between the top 1 per cent and the other 99. It’s the divide between the educated elite and everybody else… It’s the educated elites who dominate the professions and manage our major institutions… And they’re very good at passing along their advantages to their children… Privilege isn’t just defined by economic capital (or by race or gender, for that matter). It is increasingly defined by social and cultural capital

  • SCC rulings suppress Indigenous peoples’ rights to their land

    … as long as we look to Canadian institutions to resolve issues impacting Indigenous peoples, we are not talking about Indigenous nationhood or territoriality, we are talking about reification and compounding Canadian authority over Indigenous peoples. The Canadian government has an opportunity and obligation to state clearly and unequivocally its commitment to do more, be better and demonstrate its commitment to Indigenous peoples, laws, and lands by doing better and more than required by the Supreme Court of Canada.

  • Supreme Court makes it clear. Indigenous peoples can’t veto pipelines

    At the heart of this is the fact treaties signed between Indigenous nations and the Crown are part of Canada’s constitution. The courts have long held that this alone requires the government to consult with First Nations before authorizing projects that could affect treaty rights. What hasn’t been entirely clear is what consultation requires… while Indigenous peoples may have a “special public interest,” the judgment reads, in the end that interest must be balanced against other competing societal needs.

  • Beyond denial: Indigenous reconciliation requires recognition

    For reconciliation to fully manifest itself in Canada, denial must be ended in all of its aspects… to guide our work we released 10 principles – Principles Respecting Canada’s Relationship with Indigenous Peoples… [to] establish a clear, transparent foundation for reconciliation based on recognition… The principles bring a new direction and standard to how government officials must work and act in partnership with Indigenous peoples

  • Can we ever knock down the walls of the wealthy ghetto?

    There are two factors in particular that make Canada’s cycle of privilege a closed loop that excludes outsiders. The first is Canada’s lack of an inheritance tax. Taxing inheritance heavily doesn’t generate much government revenue… It expands privilege rather than keeping it cloistered… The second is Canada’s lax policy on private schools. The 6 per cent of Canadians who attend fee-charging schools are overwhelmingly there because their families are wealthy… even though their fees and sometimes their operations are taxpayer-subsidized.

  • Why are some gender activists denying science?

    … the science is settled. The two biological sexes (and there are only two) are broadly (though by no means perfectly) coterminous with gender… Close to 100 per cent of the human race is born with a set of either male or female chromosomes. A small number of people are born with chromosomal and/or reproductive abnormalities, and these people are commonly identified as “intersex.” … None of this is to argue that we should force people to conform to gender stereotypes, or punish them if they don’t.

  • Canada’s new sexual assault law is a ‘catastrophic attack’ on the rights of the accused

    They have channeled the mistaken but widespread belief that the justice system is skewed against women into Bill C-51, which has finished second reading in Parliament and will now receive attention from the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. C-51 proposes changes that will satisfy many radical feminists, but may ruin the lives of many innocent men accused of sexual assault.