• Ottawa’s ‘name-blind’ hiring a modest experiment with real promise

    … the “name-blind” hiring project announced this week is simple; the names, emails and countries of birth of job-seekers will be removed from their applications, with the aim of preventing the bias – unconscious or otherwise – that too often leads employers not to bring in applicants of diverse backgrounds for interviews.

  • Residential school story becoming over-simplified, says chief Douglas Todd

    … it seems the further the reality of the schools fades into the past the more over-simplified the national narrative becomes. Partisanship, positioning and rhetoric seems to be taking precedence over “truth” or even “reconciliation.” … the vast majority of aboriginals, suggests Miller, are like Gosnell and Calder: They emerged intact from the schools and remain Christian, with many syncretistically mixing their faith in Jesus Christ with native spiritual traditions.

  • Canadian Human Rights Commission says children left behind on basic rights

    The report looked at issues such as child welfare services on First Nations reserves, the rights of transgender children, children with disabilities and migrant children locked up in detention centres alongside their parents as the system processes their cases… 60 per cent related to disability. Almost half the disability complaints dealt with mental health issues.

  • Amnesty International honours Canada’s Indigenous-rights movement

    Amnesty International describes the Ambassador of Conscience Award as its highest honour, given annually to those who show courage in standing up to injustice. In announcing the award, Amnesty underlined the fact that although they live in a prosperous country, Canada’s Indigenous peoples are “consistently among the most marginalized members of society.”

  • Ontario urged to tackle gender pay gap with transparency law

    The changes proposed by the Toronto-based Equal Pay Coalition would require employers to report and post hourly wage and pay arrangements, including the breakdown of part-time, contract and temporary agency employees as women increasingly bear the brunt of precarious work… The gap sharpens considerably based on race and origin. The pay gap for indigenous women is 57 per cent, for immigrant women it is 39 per cent, and for racialized women it is 32 per cent.

  • South Africa’s postapartheid journey offers ‘important insights’ for Canada: Justice Minister

    “It is hard to celebrate 150 years of colonialism,” she said in a speech at the University of Cape Town’s law school. “What we need to do is make a 180-degree turn, so that our laws and policies are pointing in the direction of the future of reconciliation and transformation – not the past of colonization.” … South Africa has also created a high-level panel… to assess more than 1,000 post-apartheid laws to see if they do enough to tackle the problems of poverty and inequality… Ms. Wilson-Raybould met the former president to see what she can learn from the panel’s work

  • Alcohol and assault: What all young women need to know

    … alcohol isn’t responsible for rape. Rapists are responsible for rape… But if you could do something to reduce the risk… wouldn’t you? There are many things we can do better to reduce sexual violence. We must teach more young men to have respect for women. We must also teach young men and young women alike to have respect for booze. That’s not blaming women – it’s empowering them to manage risk.

  • A man who’ll stand up for the rights of other men (and boys) on campus and in society

    … 13 years ago, it really was an orphan topic. Nobody could get their heads around the truth, upheld by a mountain of credible data, that almost as many men suffer from intimate partner violence as women do, violence right up to the most extreme level, and including knifings, burnings and pushing down stairs… Hard-line feminists continue to see men who believe they can also be victims and who want to talk about their victimhood as a threat to women’s interests.

  • Who pays when native children fall between the cracks?

    Yes, indigenous children must receive medical and social services equal to other Canadians. A tribunal can define those rights, but the precise details of where the money comes from, and where it goes, must largely be left to negotiations among Ottawa, the provinces and First Nations.

  • Ottawa hasn’t earned trust on indigenous child welfare

    The government should do as it promised and, as the tribunal’s legally binding order demands, immediately close the funding gap… Ottawa’s slow response has been a persistent source of shame, particularly for a government that so often touts its lofty promises on indigenous issues… energy would be better spent protecting the health and safety of indigenous children than pushing back at the tribunal.