• Electricity policy: What went wrong in Ontario

    There is no way of de-risking long-term projects. Political acceptability – mutable as it may be – is an essential planning requirement… Do lead the narrative on needs, alternatives, outcome. Do allow time for people to come to the right conclusion. Do offer choices. Do model solutions. Do make the right choice easy, safe and cheap as possible.

  • Innovations in Healthcare Should Focus More on Cost-Effectiveness

    Provincial governments, with support from Ottawa, should experiment with new models of provider payment that strengthen their incentive to adopt cost-effective drugs, treatment methods, and diagnostic tests… Patients should be empowered with information… Governments should also work on creating a system of Health Technology Assessment…

  • Impacts of income volatility should be wake up call for policy-makers

    The median household that suffered a loss saw its income decrease by 49 per cent year over year. That’s almost beyond comprehension… The main causes of income fluctuation… include ebbing and flowing work hours, self-employment and multiple sources of income. In other words, the new world of work. The main effects are obvious: financial stress, the inability to plan and save for emergencies let alone retirement, the relentless reality of falling further and further behind.

  • Ontario should seize chance to lead on labour reform

    Critics have been even more vocal in insisting that increasing the minimum wage will kill too many jobs. But while some studies have shown these hikes can have an impact on employment, the effect is marginal. And while some of the costs to business are no doubt passed on to consumers, the overwhelming balance of evidence indicates the benefits far outweigh the costs.

  • Ontario plans big boost to minimum wage, update of labour laws

    Cabinet will soon decide on the biggest overhaul to Ontario’s labour law in a generation — raising minimum wage up to $15 an hour, boosting private sector unionization and targeting companies that rely unfairly on part-time or contract work… it could have far-reaching effects for people of all ages and all walks of life who worry about vacation time, job security and wage transparency as temporary workers are increasingly treated like second-class citizens.

  • Free trade within Canada gets a boost from new deal

    Critics have long complained Canada has better free trade deals with other countries than within its own borders… The centerpiece… is a framework that will help provinces and territories agree on joint regulations and harmonization of standards. “That’s going to help make Canada one of the easiest places in the world in which to do business. It’s going to make us more competitive. It’s going to create jobs,”

  • Trump’s ‘leaked’ NAFTA letter is a gift to Canada

    Ironically, half the things the United States is demanding of Canada and Mexico (e.g. access to local government procurement, meeting international labour standards) would be on Canada’s list, too. “Transparency, efficiency and predictability,” “fair, equitable non-discriminatory access,” “eliminate artificial or trade-distorting barriers to investment.”… trade negotiations do not take place in a vacuum… Does the United States want a failed state on its southern border? Does the United States need Canada’s support here or there on the world stage for a secure and prosperous North America?

  • Don’t blame foreign workers when the problem is locals who prefer EI over working

    … between December 2015 and September 2016… 67,440 temporary foreign workers were granted access to Canada to work in areas where unemployed Canadians with relevant prior work experience lived close by. That isn’t how the system is supposed to work. The temporary foreign worker program is meant to be a last resort for employers; the EI program is intended to be a safety net, not a permanent crutch.

  • Canada’s approach to board diversity needs a rethink

    Women made up 12 per cent of all board seats examined in the study, up 1 percentage point from 11 per cent in 2015… The dissatisfaction with the current regulatory regime highlights the need to consider mandatory quotas… the CSA found that only 9 per cent of companies have internal targets for women on their boards, with a mere 2 per cent having targets for women in executive positions.

  • Liberals pledge $5-billion for training, employment in 2017 federal budget

    Under the federal budget, unemployed people who want to use government-funded training programs will not have to give up their EI benefits. New loans and grants for adult students are designed to help a wider range of people, such as parents who want to return to the workforce and those who are victims of shrinking industries… women will be able to claim EI maternity benefits earlier in their pregnancy, starting at 12 weeks before the due date.