• WSIB cutting costs at expense of workers’ health, report says

    Ontario’s worker compensation board is saving money by reducing spending on drug benefits for workplace accident victims and by providing financial incentives to their health-care providers to limit treatment time, a new report compiled by a Toronto-based legal clinic says… Since 2010, the WSIB has sought to reduce its $14 billion unfunded liability, but maintains that health outcomes are improving amongst injured workers.

  • Electricity policy: What went wrong in Ontario

    There is no way of de-risking long-term projects. Political acceptability – mutable as it may be – is an essential planning requirement… Do lead the narrative on needs, alternatives, outcome. Do allow time for people to come to the right conclusion. Do offer choices. Do model solutions. Do make the right choice easy, safe and cheap as possible.

  • Innovations in Healthcare Should Focus More on Cost-Effectiveness

    Provincial governments, with support from Ottawa, should experiment with new models of provider payment that strengthen their incentive to adopt cost-effective drugs, treatment methods, and diagnostic tests… Patients should be empowered with information… Governments should also work on creating a system of Health Technology Assessment…

  • Impacts of income volatility should be wake up call for policy-makers

    The median household that suffered a loss saw its income decrease by 49 per cent year over year. That’s almost beyond comprehension… The main causes of income fluctuation… include ebbing and flowing work hours, self-employment and multiple sources of income. In other words, the new world of work. The main effects are obvious: financial stress, the inability to plan and save for emergencies let alone retirement, the relentless reality of falling further and further behind.

  • Bad policy has played a role in Canada’s housing crisis

    We ought to remove existing distortions such as favourable treatment of capital gains on real estate, provincial ownership subsidies, taxpayer-guaranteed mortgages, low residential property taxes and restrictive zoning. These policies encourage businesses and individuals to focus on real estate instead of other economic activity, exacerbate price volatility and fail to improve affordability. What better time to cut back these subsidies than when the market is soaring of its own accord and does not need artificial support?

  • Ontario’s new workplace laws will be ‘profoundly negative’ for an economy already lacking competitiveness Republish Reprint Special to Financial Post

    NationalPost.com – FP Comment May 18, 2017.   Karl Baldauf Government cannot legislate prosperity. As we look internationally, it’s clear that jurisdictions that seek to […]

  • Ontario should seize chance to lead on labour reform

    Critics have been even more vocal in insisting that increasing the minimum wage will kill too many jobs. But while some studies have shown these hikes can have an impact on employment, the effect is marginal. And while some of the costs to business are no doubt passed on to consumers, the overwhelming balance of evidence indicates the benefits far outweigh the costs.

  • Ontario plans big boost to minimum wage, update of labour laws

    Cabinet will soon decide on the biggest overhaul to Ontario’s labour law in a generation — raising minimum wage up to $15 an hour, boosting private sector unionization and targeting companies that rely unfairly on part-time or contract work… it could have far-reaching effects for people of all ages and all walks of life who worry about vacation time, job security and wage transparency as temporary workers are increasingly treated like second-class citizens.

  • Time to turn inclusive innovation rhetoric into reality

    … given that economies are no better than the societies in which they are embedded, it is critical that business leaders turn their attention to them. We desperately need to maximize both growth and equality in society – the consequences of not doing so are dire. DSIPs offer a venue of constructive private-public experimentation.

  • Encourage seniors to keeping working

    For seniors, for the economy, for all of us, the government must adapt its policies to the changing demographic reality. The steps government has already taken, both by rolling back the age of eligibility for Old Age Security and beginning to expand public pension coverage, are a good start – but only a start – toward ensuring that older workers who want to retire can.