• WSIB cutting costs at expense of workers’ health, report says

    Ontario’s worker compensation board is saving money by reducing spending on drug benefits for workplace accident victims and by providing financial incentives to their health-care providers to limit treatment time, a new report compiled by a Toronto-based legal clinic says… Since 2010, the WSIB has sought to reduce its $14 billion unfunded liability, but maintains that health outcomes are improving amongst injured workers.

  • Bad policy has played a role in Canada’s housing crisis

    We ought to remove existing distortions such as favourable treatment of capital gains on real estate, provincial ownership subsidies, taxpayer-guaranteed mortgages, low residential property taxes and restrictive zoning. These policies encourage businesses and individuals to focus on real estate instead of other economic activity, exacerbate price volatility and fail to improve affordability. What better time to cut back these subsidies than when the market is soaring of its own accord and does not need artificial support?

  • Ontario’s new workplace laws will be ‘profoundly negative’ for an economy already lacking competitiveness Republish Reprint Special to Financial Post

    NationalPost.com – FP Comment May 18, 2017.   Karl Baldauf Government cannot legislate prosperity. As we look internationally, it’s clear that jurisdictions that seek to […]

  • Encourage seniors to keeping working

    For seniors, for the economy, for all of us, the government must adapt its policies to the changing demographic reality. The steps government has already taken, both by rolling back the age of eligibility for Old Age Security and beginning to expand public pension coverage, are a good start – but only a start – toward ensuring that older workers who want to retire can.

  • Let’s make human rights central to a new NAFTA

    What the world desperately needs is a system of global rules fair to both capital and labour. Such a system would require all World Trade Organization members to respect and ratify basic labour rights, notably the right to independent unions as defined by the International Labour Organization. Such a system would also entail an enforcement mechanism with sanctions such as those which now exist to protect corporations’ rights.

  • Basic income is an opiate for the masses, not a sustainable solution

    In recent decades, the neo-liberal agenda… has created enormous amounts of wealth but not for everyone. Vast numbers of losers have also been created. A basic income would allow the neo-liberal agenda to remain intact. Job destruction could happen more easily. There would be less incentive for governments and the privileged to build a balanced economy that shrinks that wealth divide.

  • No evidence that ‘Canada works’ in new internal free trade deal

    Not only are whole sectors walled off for future negotiations (financial services, alcohol) or simply excluded (supply management) but more than half of the 329-page agreement… is taken up listing all the other exceptions insisted upon by one government or another. Even the chapters devoted to freeing trade are riddled with limitations, caveats and exemptions…

  • What if Sociologists Had as Much Influence as Economists?

    … a wide body of sociological research shows how tied up work is with a sense of purpose and identity… Sociology also offers important lessons about poverty that economics alone does not… It’s relatively clear how a change in tax policy or an adjustment to interest rates can make the economy grow faster or slower. It’s less obvious what, if anything, government can do to change forces that are driven by the human psyche.

  • Federal budget to show how infrastructure bank can attract, free up investment

    A new infrastructure bank could free up billions in new money for social services Canadians regularly use, internal government documents say — provided the experimental new institution meets its lofty financing goals… Funding for social infrastructure projects, which tend to be less attractive to private investors, could increase by one-third if the bank meets its target of leveraging $4 in private investment for every $1 from the federal government

  • Canada’s 150th year could be as pivotal as 1867 and 1967

    Canada confronts five big economic challenges: · to live within its means; · to achieve stronger productivity improvement; · to expand the globally competitive supply side of its economy; · to make itself more competitive globally in terms of risk/reward opportunity for the best people; and · to do something bold… to help better match greater private-sector strength with better public-sector infrastructure… to build solid and desirable personal lives in a country that combines dynamism with calm and common sense.