• Shrewd businesses support $15 minimum wage and decent work

    A boost to $15 an hour also gets low-wage workers closer to realizing the benefits of the productivity gains that have been made over the last 40 years. Between 1965 and 1975, the minimum wage roughly tracked productivity gains as both increased over time. However, since 1976, the two have become decoupled and minimum wage earners have not been seeing gains in their pay cheque anywhere near what the economy has seen in terms of productivity growth.

  • Cancel the panic: Canadians have been borrowing like crazy for good reason

    … even with any small forecast increases, interest rates remain low and the Canadian economy has performed adequately in terms of employment with relatively low unemployment rates. Moreover, while these macroeconomic factors are of concern, they should also be kept in context. Despite record high levels of household-sector debt, there are also record high levels of net worth.

  • Temp agencies on rise as province seeks to protect vulnerable workers

    It’s “like a huge warning bell to anyone who is concerned about (work) conditions and low wages and precariousness,” said Deena Ladd of the Toronto-based Workers’ Action Centre. “I think it’s a huge indication that corporations are shifting their responsibility to a third party for employment…” … “We seem to be growing into a society where agencies are proliferating, and these people are getting a little piece of everybody’s paycheques,” said Labour Minister Kevin Flynn

  • The Great Minimum Wage Debate: How to Balance Good Intentions and Evidence

    As a whole, they show a range of results, with many showing small to no effects on employment from small wage hikes while others show negative effects among youth and new immigrants.
    A further complication is that industries with the highest concentration of minimum wage workers are also the ones with higher potential for automation… no one can predict with confidence the exact effects from Ontario’s aggressive move from $11.60 to $14.00 per hour next January, and then to $15.00 per hour in 2019.

  • Bill 148 (The Fair Workplaces Better Jobs Act 2017)

    The Government needs to hear that the improvements to workers rights are widely supported in the community. We urge you to make a submission to the Committee supporting in principle Bill 148 while seeking further enhancements.

  • Oh! What a Lovely Trade War

    Rapid growth in globalization has hurt some American workers, and an import surge after 2000 disrupted industries and communities… globalization has already happened, and U.S. industries are now embedded in a web of international transactions. So a trade war would disrupt communities the same way that rising trade did in the past… Also, the tariffs now being proposed would boost capital-intensive industries that employ relatively few workers per dollar of sales… [and] further tilt the distribution of income against labor.

  • Minimum wage hike won’t bring ‘doom and gloom,’ economists say

    “Doom-and-gloom predictions” about the impact of minimum wage increases on job losses and inflation are not supported by evidence, according to a group of Canadian economists… some 40 economics experts from across the country claim the move “makes good economic sense” and could generate “substantial benefit to low-wage workers, their families and the economy as a whole.”

  • Ontario gets it right with move to higher minimum wage

    For over 20 years now, many highly credible studies have found that the disemployment effects of higher minimum wages are generally very close to zero… Substantial recent research in Canada, the United States and Britain also concludes that higher minimum wages succeed in lifting incomes for low-paid workers and reducing wage inequality… recent minimum wage increases are boosting spending power for low-income workers and reducing inequality.

  • New Ontario legislation ensures workers can take at least 10 sick days a year without a doctor’s note

    Bosses will be banned from asking employees for sick notes if they take 10 or fewer days a year under proposed legislation that would take effect next January 1. The measure… means fewer wasted appointments for doctors and allows workers to stay home and get well instead of spreading their germs around… the law will ensure all workers are entitled to at least 10 personal emergency leave days annually — two of which must be paid.

  • How business also benefits from the Liberals’ latest labour reforms

    Our unemployment rate of 5.8 per cent can’t get much lower; our economic growth leads the country. These are boom times for employers; but also precarious times for many employees… The beneficiaries of these reforms will be precarious employees for whom unionization has long been a remote possibility, and for whom legal protections have recently become more theoretical than practical.