• Canada may be entering ‘sweet part’ of business cycle, Stephen Poloz says

    The Canada Child Benefit has had a “pretty significant” impact on the economy, Poloz said, adding it could be one of the reasons the country has seen rising labour-force participation. “What it did is put a floor under some folks,” Poloz said, adding it may have allowed formerly stay-at-home parents to afford child care or a second car and therefore more easily re-enter the workforce.

  • Time to follow America’s lead on minimum wage

    … Even if business scaremongering about a wage hike were remotely true (at the margins), the reality is that a rapid increase in interest rates would have far more impact, as would a collapse in the housing market… the politicians… are merely playing catch-up… the heavy lifting happened outside Ontario, with Alberta’s NDP government leading the way to a $15 target in Canada.

  • Tribunal slams WSIB practice that cuts benefits to injured migrant workers

    A workers’ compensation board practice that slashes benefits to injured migrant farm workers by deeming them capable of finding alternative employment in Ontario is illegal, an independent tribunal has ruled… under the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program, employers can deport workers for “non-compliance, refusal to work, or any other sufficient reason.”

  • What minimum-wage critics don’t want you to know

    The most that any of these studies can claim is that employment will grow more slowly under higher minimum wages than in their absence. None predict that employment will decline… I am going out on a limb to predict that employment in all three provinces will increase with higher minimum wages – not because of them, of course, but because of factors (such as economic growth, population and aggregate demand) that matter most to employment. This is the perfect time to redirect growth so more benefit reaches those who need it most.

  • Most small businesses go nowhere, why tilt the tax system in their favour?

    The best way to stimulate productivity isn’t by subsidizing the creation of a lot of tiny, uncompetitive firms with no hope of going anywhere. It’s by opening the economy to competition and market disruption. Only we’re not terribly keen on either. We don’t need a pro-small business tax policy in this country. We need a pro-growth policy. And the starting point is to get rid of the small business deduction.

  • Why business and banks hate the minimum wage

    … high-wage employers benefit from reduced turnover, lower recruitment costs, and greater productivity. That’s why more than 40 economists also signed an open letter cautioning against “fear-mongering that is out of line with the latest economic research”… At a time when the provincial unemployment rate has plunged to the lowest level in 16 years — 5.8 per cent last month — business interests want us to believe that we can’t afford it?

  • Doubling the length of tweets won’t fix Twitter’s real problem

    Twitter has irreversibly altered our sense of public discourse by convincing us that any argument worth having – religion/politics/racism – can be successfully advanced or bested in a 140-character feat of witty genius… Part of our accommodation consisted in us confusing ideas with information… tweets aren’t meant to be interrogated or analyzed. They aren’t meant to spur long, nuanced discussion – which is the kind of discussion our world desperately needs.

  • Ontario is complicit in precarious employment

    Thanks to a complex web of loopholes, employers have offloaded much of the liability and risk of maintaining permanent staff to these temp agencies, which insulate them from the financial consequences of workplace accidents… higher premiums have no lasting consequences for a temp agency that can disappear with the click of a mouse and rebrand itself the next day… it’s not just precarious workers who face extra peril, but all taxpayers and businesses who pay a price for this sleight of hand by the unseen hand of temporary agencies.

  • 9 Times Canada’s Labour Movement Made History and Shaped the Country We Live in Today

    … it’s not that hard to find examples of how the labour movement helped shape the country we live in today. Whether they’re fighting for shorter work days or better wages, the labour movement has done more than just improve working conditions for ordinary people – by standing up to powerful elites, time and again, Canada’s labour movement set in motion series of events that changed the course of history and moved Canada forward. Here are just nine examples…

  • End of income sprinkling will affect one in eight small-business owners: study

    … according to new research from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives… small-business owners most likely to be affected by the tax-savings measure are male, professionals such as doctors or lawyers who make more than $216,000 a year and with spouses or adult children who don’t work… data from Statistics Canada and tax filers, showed income sprinkling was almost entirely benefiting wealthy Canadians.