• Preserving the quality of university education in Ontario

    Ontario’s universities currently receive the lowest level of public per-student funding in Canada, are not hiring full-time faculty at the rate necessary to keep pace with student enrolment, and have the highest student-faculty ratios in the country. OCUFA’s recommendations to the Standing Committee include: Increasing per-student funding for Ontario’s universities to match the average for the rest of Canada… that brings Ontario’s student-faculty ratio in line with the rest of Canada

  • Canada doesn’t have a Harvard, and that’s a good thing

    … getting into a “top” Canadian university is nowhere near as difficult as entering an elite U.S. college: the entire undergraduate population of the Ivy League is roughly equivalent to that of the University of Toronto. Moreover, the consequences of not getting into a top Canadian school are relatively minor: those who graduate from a Canadian undergraduate program are on a much more equal footing than they are in the U.S.

  • Shutting down schools hurts small towns, but it doesn’t have to be that way

    Due to a misguided education-funding model that depends on high enrollment levels, and therefore favours urban schools, dozens of communities in rural and small-town Ontario may lose their public schools. Contrary to the rhetoric, this doesn’t need to happen. Schools can be vital centres of activity, particularly for smaller and rural communities.

  • Tuition increase at Ontario colleges and universities capped at 3%

    … the government announced students whose families earn less than $50,000 will be given grants equal to or greater than the average tuition, starting next fall. Half of students whose parents earn $83,000 or less will receive more in non-repayable grants than they have to pay in tuition fees. The government is funding the changes by cancelling the tuition and education tax credits.

  • The End of Identity Liberalism

    We need a post-identity liberalism, and it should draw from the past successes of pre-identity liberalism… It would speak to the nation as a nation of citizens who are in this together and must help one another. As for narrower issues that are highly charged symbolically and can drive potential allies away, especially those touching on sexuality and religion, such a liberalism would work quietly, sensitively and with a proper sense of scale.

  • Hot!

    Why we are weaning our students from electronic noise

    We’ve decided to… ban… all electronic devices from both the course lectures and the discussion sections… thinking thrives on silence or on dialogue with other human voices, when electronic noise has faded. We hope to help wean our students from that noise. Our new policy is a small step, but we’re convinced that it’s in the right direction.

  • Ontario coalition pushes for transparency on autism policies

    … the Ontario Autism Coalition asked Children’s Minister Michael Coteau to waive confidentiality agreements it says will muzzle panel members and limit their ability to hold the government to account. “It’s time to restore some trust between the government and the autism community by permitting a full and open discussion about how we help kids with autism in Ontario”… The newly launched Ontario autism program advisory committee includes parents, educators and experts.

  • A closer look at the StatCan tuition data reveals some worrying trends

    Ontario’s domestic undergraduate fees are 74 per cent higher than the average in the rest of Canada… Graduate tuition is even worse: 96 per cent higher than the rest of Canada, having increased by 13 per cent since 2010, compared to six per cent in the RoC. International fees tell a similar tale: undergraduate tuition fees are 54 per cent higher than the rest of Canada, and graduate fees are 66 per cent higher.

  • On campus, it’s good to be bothered by a diversity of ideas

    … consider the advice U.S. President Barack Obama… “There will be times when you shouldn’t compromise your core values, your integrity and you will have the responsibility to speak up in the face of injustice. But listen. Engage. If the other side has a point, learn from them. If they’re wrong, rebut them. Teach them. Beat them on the battlefield of ideas… you will have to deal with ignorance, hatred, racism, foolishness, trifling folks … at every stage of your life.”

  • Ontario’s schools have issues – but don’t blame funding cuts

    … for an explanation for resource challenges in Ontario’s public schools, look to how the system is organized and managed… Archaic regulations, union monopoly (which helps create misaligned incentives for both bureaucrats and educators), lack of responsiveness to parental demands, and centralized, prescriptive curriculum are just a few of the many handcuffs holding back Ontario’s public-school systems… the problems in Ontario public education require a fundamental restructuring