• Think education in Ontario doesn’t need to be protected as a human right? Think again

    If you have access to education, you are more likely to know your rights, and know how to advocate for yourself and for others… By framing education as a fundamental human right, we place the emphasis on education for all without discrimination; the obligation of states to protect, respect and fulfil this right; and the need for accountability mechanisms when people cannot realize their right.

  • It’s time to merge Ontario’s two school systems

    Consolidation of school systems will save money by eliminating service duplication, and it will eradicate enrolment competition between the two systems. And contrary to a widely held perception, denominational schools are not necessarily protected by Canada’s Constitution, as previously demonstrated in the provinces of Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Québec.

  • Ontario cancels curriculum rewrite that would boost Indigenous content

    Although the new government of Premier Doug Ford says it did not order the cancellation, a statement from Education Minister Lisa Thompson suggests the move was made by the bureaucracy to cut costs… the ministry cancelled three curriculum writing sessions, including those on: TRC curriculum revisions, American Sign Language, and Indigenous languages in kindergarten… The ministry “will continue to move ahead with” the curriculum revisions related to the TRC… but did not indicate when that would happen.

  • Education reform must be on the table in Ontario

    In 2018-19, Ontario will spend $29.1 billion on K-12 education, representing one-fifth of all program spending in the province… That places Ontario third in per student spending among the provinces, behind only Alberta and Saskatchewan, and more than 20% higher than neighbouring Quebec… Many Ontarians are likely unaware of how unique Ontario’s K-12 education system is compared to the other provinces. Ontario is one of only three provinces that deliver religious education

  • Students in poorer neighbourhoods may miss out on ‘vital programs,’ report says

    The findings, based on a survey of 1,244 principals from across the province found that elementary schools where parents are better educated and have more money are twice as likely to have a music teacher as schools where parental education is considered low. It found similar trends for specialist teachers in visual arts and drama… Research shows high quality child care boosts children’s social, emotional and literacy development as well as long term learning and success

  • What the 2018 election results mean for Ontario’s professors and academic librarians

    The Ontario PC platform was silent on almost all postsecondary issues, and did not provide a plan for postsecondary education in Ontario. It did not include any reference to addressing underfunding for postsecondary education or the need for a faculty renewal strategy in the province. However, the platform statement did emphasize the PC party’s belief that Ontario has a “spending problem”. Such a statement should be of grave concern when it comes to public funding for all public services, including postsecondary education.

  • As universities ‘Indigenize,’ some see a threat to open inquiry

    Universities poach relatively scarce Indigenous professors from rival institutions, and some set quotas for hiring Indigenous professors and enrolling Indigenous students. They are rethinking curricula, a few schools introducing mandatory Indigenous-themed courses and others incorporating Indigenous knowledge in existing courses. And questions are getting louder about who is entitled to teach about Indigenous people.

  • Is Canada really facing a brain drain?

    … Canada isn’t just three universities, STEM isn’t just tech and “graduates” includes more than just the ones who use LinkedIn… It’s not that the conclusion is necessarily wrong, it’s that the actual evidence is far too slim to support the claims being made. Policy-makers should handle this study with extreme caution.

  • A university president apologizes for academia’s role in residential schools

    The continuing failure to address this history has meant the previous ways of thinking — or of not thinking — about the residential school system have remained largely intact. Failing to confront a heinous history, even if it is one we did not cause, is to become complicit in its perpetuation… While we cannot rewrite this history, we must not deny it either. It is our history to own and learn from.

  • Ontario Liberals promise $300-million to support special education

    Premier Kathleen Wynne called the increased funding a significant and permanent investment in the province’s special education system. It will go toward hiring about 2,000 new workers in schools, including psychologists, speech and language pathologists and educational assistants, and eliminating the wait list to have children’s special education needs assessed. One in six children in Ontario needs special support, Ms. Wynne said.