• Fighting a war of attrition on college campuses to the last student body

    A sheepish Liberal government — the provincial paymaster behind the scenes — has acknowledged that it now needs to do for colleges what it long ago did for school boards. The government relies on an independent advisory body to declare whenever a strike threatens the school year, and now wants to emulate that model at the college level.

  • All students deserve respect in classroom

    Inclusivity for all diverse learners warrants a clear and concise commitment to support teachers, support staff and administrators, with the appropriate continuous professional learning and resources to ensure success… statements from parents… serve as a call to action to ensure that no child feels excluded because of their learning need or exceptionality. The diversity of learners in today’s classroom is the norm and no longer the exception.

  • Tens of millions in grants targeted for needy students aren’t reaching them

    Tens of millions of dollars earmarked for Ontario’s most vulnerable students, who are poor or new to the country, are instead being used by school boards to cover other costs, the Auditor General of Ontario has found. That’s largely because of an outdated funding formula that leaves boards scrambling to cover shortfalls in areas such as special education and gives them huge discretion in whether they use grants the way they are intended

  • Ontario Breaking Ground in Indigenous Postsecondary Education

    Ontario is taking a historic step in recognizing the unique role Indigenous Institutes have in the province’s postsecondary education system with the introduction of new legislation that, if passed, would transfer key functions and oversight to Indigenous people. The legislation, if passed, would recognize Indigenous Institutes as unique and complementary pillar of Ontario’s postsecondary education system… It is also another important step on the path to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

  • Canada’s universities commit to diversity with plan to make demographic data public

    The promise to address under-representation of some groups in areas where it may occur, whether it’s the lack of Indigenous students in professional faculties or women in leadership posts, comes as universities are discussing how to meet equity targets in the Canada Research Chairs (CRC) program… schools have consistently failed to meet equity targets set by the program’s steering committee. Academics with disabilities are particularly poorly represented among CRC holders

  • End unjust and ineffective practice of academic streaming

    For nearly a quarter century, this policy has done nothing to advance the academic prospects of Ontario students while doing a great deal to reinforce the educational disadvantages experienced by low-income and Black kids. It’s high time to end it… The education system should be a tool for redressing inequities, not compounding them.

  • Even with new investments in affordability, Ontario remains most expensive province in which to pursue higher education

    Ontario remains the most expensive province in which to pursue post-secondary education, according to data released today by Statistics Canada. Average undergraduate tuition fees for the 2017-2018 academic year will be $8,454, up from $8,114 in the previous year… The current tuition fee framework will expire in 2019, and students are calling on the government to ensure that the next framework reverses this decade-long trend of rising costs for students and their families.

  • Prevent mental-health care crises on campus

    … demand for mental health services at Canadian post-secondary institutions has reached an all-time high. But schools don’t seem to be prepared to meet the growing need, a failure that can have grave consequences. While no university or college can meet the full spectrum of students’ mental health needs, schools can and must do more to improve existing supports.

  • Financial information of universities and degree-granting colleges, 2015/2016

    Canada’s 150 public universities and degree-granting institutions spent $27.1 billion in 2015/2016, up from $26.8 billion in 2014/2015. Revenues fell from $28.4 billion in 2014/2015 to $27.2 billion in 2015/2016… The proportion of provincial funding decreased from 41.5% in 2010/2011 to 39.1% in 2015/2016… The proportion of revenues from tuition fees has grown from 21.5% in 2010/2011 to 27.9% in 2015/2016.

  • Niagara school makes the grade for at-risk students trying to attend college, university

    Though the plan at first was to cater to low-income students only, that proved controversial so the focus became “first generation” students blazing post-secondary paths in their families… The school opened with just 124 students, and this fall will have 450 elementary and secondary students… the higher-level academic is the only offering and, in Grade 11, college and university-level classes… All grads are getting a small bursary and laptop as graduation presents, thanks to community sponsorships.