• A clear call to move Canadian research forward

    Because of research, the average life expectancy of a Canadian born today is double what it was when the country was created 150 years ago. The social, health and economic benefits are so pervasive that it is sometimes difficult to see how important fundamental research has become to our lives… the landmark report… by … David Naylor should be compulsory reading

  • Province boosts education funding to $24B for next school year

    Ontario is increasing education spending by almost 4 per cent to $23.8 billion in the next school year, with a focus on providing more special education support and reducing class sizes… The education funding includes money to hire hundreds more special education teachers and support workers based on local need, and capping class sizes in full-day kindergarten as well as grades 4 through 8.

  • Parents battle for son’s right to autism services in school

    If successful, it could pave the way to school boards providing better supports for the 20,000 autistic students in Ontario… The Skrts argue the Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board is violating Jack’s rights by failing to provide him with accommodations he is legally entitled to receive as a result of his disability. “This amounts to discrimination,” says the application, which is seeking a tribunal order requiring Ontario school boards to ensure ABA is available to students with autism.

  • Ontario should save kids from interminable bus commutes

    … school boards across Ontario are struggling to deal with a declining student population. Many boards are targeting small rural schools for closure, even though their enrolment is often higher than schools in larger centres… It’s not just the long hours that are detrimental… but the total disconnect from local life… hours spent on a dreary bus ride are hours they can’t be in extra-circular sports, clubs or just playing shinny. Ontario must do better, for the sake its children.

  • Preserving the quality of university education in Ontario

    Ontario’s universities currently receive the lowest level of public per-student funding in Canada, are not hiring full-time faculty at the rate necessary to keep pace with student enrolment, and have the highest student-faculty ratios in the country. OCUFA’s recommendations to the Standing Committee include: Increasing per-student funding for Ontario’s universities to match the average for the rest of Canada… that brings Ontario’s student-faculty ratio in line with the rest of Canada

  • Canada doesn’t have a Harvard, and that’s a good thing

    … getting into a “top” Canadian university is nowhere near as difficult as entering an elite U.S. college: the entire undergraduate population of the Ivy League is roughly equivalent to that of the University of Toronto. Moreover, the consequences of not getting into a top Canadian school are relatively minor: those who graduate from a Canadian undergraduate program are on a much more equal footing than they are in the U.S.

  • Shutting down schools hurts small towns, but it doesn’t have to be that way

    Due to a misguided education-funding model that depends on high enrollment levels, and therefore favours urban schools, dozens of communities in rural and small-town Ontario may lose their public schools. Contrary to the rhetoric, this doesn’t need to happen. Schools can be vital centres of activity, particularly for smaller and rural communities.

  • Tuition increase at Ontario colleges and universities capped at 3%

    … the government announced students whose families earn less than $50,000 will be given grants equal to or greater than the average tuition, starting next fall. Half of students whose parents earn $83,000 or less will receive more in non-repayable grants than they have to pay in tuition fees. The government is funding the changes by cancelling the tuition and education tax credits.

  • The End of Identity Liberalism

    We need a post-identity liberalism, and it should draw from the past successes of pre-identity liberalism… It would speak to the nation as a nation of citizens who are in this together and must help one another. As for narrower issues that are highly charged symbolically and can drive potential allies away, especially those touching on sexuality and religion, such a liberalism would work quietly, sensitively and with a proper sense of scale.

  • Why we are weaning our students from electronic noise

    We’ve decided to… ban… all electronic devices from both the course lectures and the discussion sections… thinking thrives on silence or on dialogue with other human voices, when electronic noise has faded. We hope to help wean our students from that noise. Our new policy is a small step, but we’re convinced that it’s in the right direction.